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Hungry, Hungry Caterpillars!

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It starts out slow. Beginning in the spring (and sometimes year-around in some locales) Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) lay their eggs on their host plant, the passionflower vine (Passiflora). They deposit their eggs on the tendrils, on the...

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary laying eggs on her host plant, passionflower vine. Note the eggs (yellow dots) on the left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

By fall, the only thing left on the passionflower vine is the fruit. The leaves are gone. The hungry caterpillars are like insect shredding machines. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No leaves--just fruit--remain on this skeletonized passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The end result: a Gulf Fritillary adult. This one is nectaring on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They Don't Announce Their Arrival or Departure

A female variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They don't announce their arrival or departure. If you're an insect photographer, or a wanna-be-insect photographer, expect the unexpected and don't go anywhere without your camera. That applies to such simple things as walking out your back door and...

A female variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum, perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In this view, you can see the “bi-colored” Pterostigma on the wing tip and the two black spots on the top of the tip of the abdomen,
In this view, you can see the “bi-colored” Pterostigma on the wing tip and the two black spots on the top of the tip of the abdomen," noted Greg Kareofelas, Bohart Museum of Entomology associate. "This is unique to this species (Sympetrum corruptum)." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In this view, you can see the “bi-colored” Pterostigma on the wing tip and the two black spots on the top of the tip of the abdomen," noted Greg Kareofelas, Bohart Museum of Entomology associate. "This is unique to this species (Sympetrum corruptum)." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A blurred Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) forms a backdrop for the variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A blurred Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) forms a backdrop for the variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A blurred Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) forms a backdrop for the variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flickering light and backdrop of a Mexican sunflower add to this image of the dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flickering light and backdrop of a Mexican sunflower add to this image of the dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flickering light and backdrop of a Mexican sunflower add to this image of the dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 16, 2018 at 5:00 PM

Spotting the Cabbage White Butterfly

A cabbage white butterlfy, Pieris rapae, heads for lantana in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're everywhere. But they're not welcome. Agriculturists who commercially grow cabbage and other cucurbits aren't fond of the cabbage white butterlfy, Pieris rapae, because its larvae are pests that ravish their crops. No welcome mat for...

A cabbage white butterlfy, Pieris rapae, heads for lantana in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterlfy, Pieris rapae, heads for lantana in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterlfy, Pieris rapae, heads for lantana in a Vacaville garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The cabbage white butterfly flips. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The cabbage white butterfly flips. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The cabbage white butterfly flips. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cabbage white butterfly returns to sip some nectar from the lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cabbage white butterfly returns to sip some nectar from the lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cabbage white butterfly returns to sip some nectar from the lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 15, 2018 at 5:02 PM

International Exposure for Three UC Davis-Affiliated Photographers

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

Images by three UC Davis-affiliated photographers will be among those displayed at the international Insect Salon photography competition at the Entomological Society of America's meeting, Nov. 11-14 in Vancouver, B.C. The insect photographers:...

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)
This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a wasp mimic, Ceriana tridens, ovipositing in the fissures of a tree, will be showcased at the Entomological Society of America meeting in November in Vancouver,B.C. (Photo by Alexander Nguyen)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)
This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image of a leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, showing the bee carrying a petal to her nest, won a spot in the international Insect Salon photo competition. (Photo by Allan Jones)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a  honey bee covered with pollen from mustard.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This winning image, accepted in the international Insect Salon photo competition, shows a honey bee covered with pollen from mustard. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oct. 19th Seminar at UC Davis: Do Butterflies Dream of Genetic Tattoos?

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Do butterflies dream of genetic tattoos? That's part of the creative title of a seminar that Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, will deliver next week to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and...

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)
Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

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