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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Why You Ought to Be Concerned About Plant-Parastic Nematodes

Plant nematologist Shahid Masood Siddique is a new member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you like to eat a variety of foods and if you like to wear cotton, you ought to be concerned about plant-parasitic nematodes. And you ought to be interested in the exciting research that Shahid Masood Siddique, a new member of the UC Davis Department...

Plant nematologist Shahid Masood Siddique is a new member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Plant nematologist Shahid Masood Siddique is a new member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Plant nematologist Shahid Masood Siddique is a new member of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Bug Land

A funny thing happened on the way to Bug Land. Well, many funny things. Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor of entomology at the University of California, Davis, teaches a course on general entomology and you...


"The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.

"The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.


"The infected fleas can harbor rats, ground squirrels, rabbits, and occasionally, even house cats." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.

"The infected fleas can harbor rats, ground squirrels, rabbits, and occasionally, even house cats." Sentence by one of Lynn Kimsey's students; illustration by UC Davis graphic artist/entomology student Karissa Merritt.

What's for Dinner? How About a Green Bottle Fly?

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's for dinner? A crab spider, camouflaged in our lavender patch, didn't catch a honey bee, a butterfly, an ant or a syrphid fly. No, it nailed a green bottle fly. We couldn't help but notice. The fly's metallic blue-green coloring stood in sharp...

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dines on a green bottle fly in a lavender patch in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The crab spider is camouflaged, but its prey, a green bottle fly with its familiar metallic blue-green coloring, isn't. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 25, 2019 at 4:53 PM

Golden Orbweavers Ignore Biological Rules

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

Size does matter. Have you ever wondered about sexual size dimorphism in the tropical spiders, the golden orbweavers? The females are sometimes 10 times larger and 100 times heavier than their male counterparts. And the webs that the females ...

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)
A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

A female Trichonephila clavipes (formerly Nephila clavipes) is a giant compared to her small male (below). The research covers a complex pattern of sexual size dimorphism in this group of spiders, family Nephilidae. (Image copyright by Chris Hamilton, University of Idaho)

Let's Celebrate National Pollinator Week

A ceramic/mosaic sculpture,

Did you know that next week is National Pollinator Week? It is. June 17-21 is the week set aside to celebrate pollinators and how we can protect them. Actually, National Pollinator Week should be every day. Launched 12 years ago under U.S. Senate...

A ceramic/mosaic sculpture,
A ceramic/mosaic sculpture, "Miss Bee Haven," anchors the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. It is the work of self-described rock artist Donna Billick of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A ceramic/mosaic sculpture, "Miss Bee Haven," anchors the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis. It is the work of self-described rock artist Donna Billick of Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors to the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven can learn what to plant to attract pollinators. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Visitors to the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven can learn what to plant to attract pollinators. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Visitors to the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven can learn what to plant to attract pollinators. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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