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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Learn About Honey Bee Anatomy at UC Davis Class

The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on

Consider the honey bee. Like all insects, it has a head, thorax and abdomen. But are you familiar with the rest of its anatomy? Here's an opportunity to learn about "Advanced Anatomy and Physiology of the Honey Bee" in a class offered Saturday, Oct. 19...

The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on
The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on "Advanced Anatomy and Physiology of the Honey Bee" takes place Oct. 19 at UC Davis, and is offered by the UC Davis-based California Master Beekeeper Program. This image was taken in Vacaville of a bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The parts of a honey bee include the head, thorax and abdomen. A class on "Advanced Anatomy and Physiology of the Honey Bee" takes place Oct. 19 at UC Davis, and is offered by the UC Davis-based California Master Beekeeper Program. This image was taken in Vacaville of a bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Making of a Bee Garden at UC Davis

This photo, taken in 2010, shows the makings of the bee garden on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis campus. It was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The making of a bee garden... It was the fall of 2009 when a half-acre bee garden on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis campus, sprang to life. Headlines on colony collapse disorder dominated the news media, as scientists declared "honey bees are in...

This photo, taken in 2010, shows the makings of the bee garden on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis campus. It was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This photo, taken in 2010, shows the makings of the bee garden on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis campus. It was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This photo, taken in 2010, shows the makings of the bee garden on Bee Biology Road, UC Davis campus. It was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, Robbin Thorp (Aug. 26, 1933-June 7, 2019), detected more than 80 species of bees in the garden. This image was taken in April 2011. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, Robbin Thorp (Aug. 26, 1933-June 7, 2019), detected more than 80 species of bees in the garden. This image was taken in April 2011. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Distinguished emeritus professor of entomology, Robbin Thorp (Aug. 26, 1933-June 7, 2019), detected more than 80 species of bees in the garden. This image was taken in April 2011. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Diane Ullman, former chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, with bee boxes that her students made for the bee garden. She and artist Donna Billick co-founded and co-directed the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program and provided art for the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Professor Diane Ullman, former chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, with bee boxes that her students made for the bee garden. She and artist Donna Billick co-founded and co-directed the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program and provided art for the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Diane Ullman, former chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, with bee boxes that her students made for the bee garden. She and artist Donna Billick co-founded and co-directed the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion Program and provided art for the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The bee garden today, 10 years later. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The bee garden today, 10 years later. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The bee garden today, 10 years later. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bugs and Bees, Bees and Bugs

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bugs and bees. Bees and bugs. That's what's on the menu--or that's what's buzzing--over the next few weeks in the Davis/Berkeley area. Bugs. Saturday, Sept. 21Open House, Bohart Museum of Entomology Open House, UC DavisThe Bohart Museum of Entomology...

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heading toward a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on germander, Teucrium chamaedrys. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on germander, Teucrium chamaedrys. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on germander, Teucrium chamaedrys. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on the tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will Milkweed Bugs Eat Aphids?

Yes, milkweed bugs feed on oleander aphids. This is a large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) with an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, they will! Milkweed bugs gained the nickname of "seed eaters" for primarily eating the seeds of milkweed. Actually, they are opportunistic and generalists, says Hugh Dingle, emeritus professor of entomology at the University of California,...

Yes, milkweed bugs feed on oleander aphids. This is a large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) with an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Yes, milkweed bugs feed on oleander aphids. This is a large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) with an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, milkweed bugs feed on oleander aphids. This is a large milkweed bug (Oncopeltus fasciatus) with an aphid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Geoffrey Attardo's Landmark Research on Genomics of Tsetse Flies

Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You probably don't think much about the blood-sucking tsetse fly--unless you're living in Africa or are planning to travel there. But if you're UC Davis entomologist-geneticist Geoffrey Attardo, you do. He led landmark research published Sept. 2 in the...

Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye-to-eye with a gravid (pregnant) tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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