Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Not Jiminy

Jerusalem Cricket

It was an unexpected visit. UC Davis bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey noticed the critter in one of the restrooms at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis. She found it several days after the massive Oct. 12 storm raced...

Jerusalem Cricket
Jerusalem Cricket

JERUSALEM CRICKET is not really a true cricket or a true bug. It's an insect that burrows beneath the soil to feed on decaying organic matter. During a heavy rainfall, you'll see them emerge from the soaked ground. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Big 'Un
Big 'Un

BIG 'UN--This Jerusalem cricket is quite large (note the size of the pencil tip next to it). Some of these insects can reach 2.7 inches in length. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of a head of a Jerusalem cricket. Note the mud splattered on one eye. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Release
Release

BEE BREEDER-GENETICIST Susan Cobey releases the Jerusalem cricket on the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research facility grounds. It was found inside the facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 15, 2009 at 6:20 PM

Life and Death in the Hive

Queen Bee

Life and death in the bee observation hive... If you ever have the opportunity to check out a bee observation hive--a glassed-in hive showing the colony at work--you can easily spot the three castes: the queen bee, worker bees and drones. If you look...

Queen Bee
Queen Bee

QUEEN BEE, marked with the dot, is circled by her royal attendants in a retinue. This was taken through the glass of an observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Undertaker Bee
Undertaker Bee

IN THIS BEE OBSERVATION HIVE photo, an undertaker bee carries out her dead sister. The glassed-in observation hive offers a view of life and death in the hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 at 6:45 PM

Blue Day for the Bees

Blue Marguerite Daisy

It's a blue day for the honey bees. The massive Northern California storm--one of our worst-ever storms and marked by heavy rains and equally strong winds--means that bees are clustering inside their hives. No foraging today. Just last Sunday we saw...

Blue Marguerite Daisy
Blue Marguerite Daisy

HONEY BEE nectars a blue marguerite daisy, a member of the sunflower family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tongue Extended
Tongue Extended

TONGUE EXTENDED, a honey bee sips nectar from a blue marguerite daisy. Notice the yellow pollen on her leg. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 13, 2009 at 5:24 PM
Tags: blue marguerite daisy (1), honey bee (195), storm (1)

Cold Case

Egg Case

Here's a "cold case" to investigate. Check your backyard or neighborhood park and see if a praying mantis has deposited an egg case on a tree limb, plant or fence. Case in point: Over at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, west of...

Egg Case
Egg Case

THIS EGG CASE on a potted plant outside the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis, will yield from 100 to 200 tiny mantises next spring when the weather warms. A praying mantis recently deposited her eggs on the plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Prey?
Prey?

ARE YOU A PREY?--A pugnacious praying mantis eyes the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 12, 2009 at 5:56 PM

Not a Pretty Sight

Varroa Mite

It's not a pretty sight--the Varroa mite attacking a honey bee. Beekeepers are accustomed to seeing the reddish-brown, eight-legged parasite (aka "blood sucker") in their hives. UC Davis bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey, manager of the Harry H....

Varroa Mite
Varroa Mite

THIS VARROA MITE is feeding on a drone pupa. Varroa mites reproduce in the brood cells and attack the developing bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mite Free
Mite Free

UNLIKE many bees, these drones (males) are mite free. Most hives throughout the United States have Varroa mites. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 9, 2009 at 6:34 PM
Tags: drone (3), Susan Cobey (83), Varroa mite (13)

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