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A Worthy Cause: A Water Bear Sculpture

An artist's sketch of the proposed tardigrade sculpture in front of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.

If you're looking for a worthy cause to support during the giving season (and as a bonus, receive a tax deduction), think tardigrades, aka water bears. Or more specifically, think "sculpture in front of the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the...

An artist's sketch of the proposed tardigrade sculpture in front of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.
An artist's sketch of the proposed tardigrade sculpture in front of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.

An artist's sketch of the proposed tardigrade sculpture in front of the Bohart Museum of Entomology.

John Mola: The Ins and Outs of Bumble Bee Movement

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heads for a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's all about the bumble bees... And now doctoral candidate John Mola of the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, will present his exit seminar on "Bumble Bee Movement Ecology and Response to Wildfire" at 4:10 p.m.,...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heads for a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heads for a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heads for a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral candidate John Mola stands by his first-place poster at the 2018 UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral candidate John Mola stands by his first-place poster at the 2018 UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral candidate John Mola stands by his first-place poster at the 2018 UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Geoffrey Attardo: Exploring Tsetse Fly Reproduction

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Consider the tsetse fly. The blood-sucking insect, which transmits the parasite that causes human and animal trypanosomiasis, has wreaked havoc in African countries. It's distinguished from other Diptera by unique adaptations, "including lactation...

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)
Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Eating Insects at the Bohart Museum of Entomology

Cousins Aryanna Nicole Torres, 8, of Woodland and Aaden Matthew Brazelton, 8, of Vacaville, get ready to eat insects. Their grandmother, UC Davis employee Elvira Galvan Hack of Dixon, accompanied them to the museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Fact: Eighty percent of the world's population eat insects. Fact: At least 80 percent of those attending the Bohart Museum of Entomology's open house on entomophagy ate one or more insects--a cricket, an earthworm or a mealworm. The diners ranged in age...

Cousins Aryanna Nicole Torres, 8, of Woodland and Aaden Matthew Brazelton, 8, of Vacaville, get ready to eat insects. Their grandmother, UC Davis employee Elvira Galvan Hack of Dixon, accompanied them to the museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cousins Aryanna Nicole Torres, 8, of Woodland and Aaden Matthew Brazelton, 8, of Vacaville, get ready to eat insects. Their grandmother, UC Davis employee Elvira Galvan Hack of Dixon, accompanied them to the museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cousins Aryanna Nicole Torres, 8, of Woodland and Aaden Matthew Brazelton, 8, of Vacaville, get ready to eat insects. Their grandmother, UC Davis employee Elvira Galvan Hack of Dixon, accompanied them to the museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eager eaters--this brother and sister from Dixon loved eating insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eager eaters--this brother and sister from Dixon loved eating insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eager eaters--this brother and sister from Dixon loved eating insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These youngsters enjoyed holding the critters from the live
These youngsters enjoyed holding the critters from the live "petting zoo." They included Madagascar hissing cockroaches and walking sticks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These youngsters enjoyed holding the critters from the live "petting zoo." They included Madagascar hissing cockroaches and walking sticks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A close-up of the earthworms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A close-up of the earthworms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A close-up of the earthworms. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This display,
This display, "Bug Buffet," featuring appetizers and entrees, drew lots of interest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This display, "Bug Buffet," featuring appetizers and entrees, drew lots of interest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 2, 2019 at 3:15 PM

The Butterfly and the Bird

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly fluttered into our pollinator garden in Vacaville yesterday and sipped nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) as a bird looked on. Well, sort of looked on. The bird was decorative art. The monarch was real. Now if that bird had...

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in front of a bird, decorative art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Up, up and away--but not because the bird was a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch returns to the bird sighting, this time to sip nectar by its feet. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch spreads its wings. The bird cannot. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 1, 2019 at 4:47 PM

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