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Posts Tagged: Geoffrey Attardo

Tsetse Flies: Who Knew?

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Did you read the article in today's New York Times about tsetse flies and the scientists who research them? Totally fascinating. Tsetse fly expert Geoffrey Attardo, a medical entomologist and assistant professor with  the UC Davis Department of...

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)
Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Close-up of a gravid tsetse fly (Glossina morsitans morsitans). (Photo by Geoffrey Attardo)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office in Briggs Hall, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office in Briggs Hall, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office in Briggs Hall, UC Davis campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis Seminars: From Spotted Wing Drosophila to Spider Glue to Wild Bees

Spotted-wing drosophila on raspberry. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

From spotted wing drosophila to spider glue to wild bees! Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo, assistant professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, has compiled a great line-up of speakers for the winter quarter. The Wednesday...

Spotted-wing drosophila on raspberry. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Spotted-wing drosophila on raspberry. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Spotted-wing drosophila on raspberry. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oct. 19th Seminar at UC Davis: Do Butterflies Dream of Genetic Tattoos?

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Do butterflies dream of genetic tattoos? That's part of the creative title of a seminar that Arnaud Martin, assistant professor of biology, George Washington University, Washington, DC, will deliver next week to the UC Davis Department of Entomology and...

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)
Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Butterflies showing mutated wings on their right sides. This image was used in one of Arnaud Martin's research publications. (Credit: Nathalie Vessillier)

Targeting the Tsetse Fly

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

He targets the tsetse fly. Tsetse flies, large biting flies that inhabit much of Africa, feed on the blood of humans and other vertebrates and transmit such parasitic diseases as African trypanosomiasis. In humans, this disease is better known as...

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Targeting the Asian Citrus Psyllid

The Asian citrus psyllid, about the size of an aphid, is a major threat to the multibillion dollar citrus industry in the United States.(Photo courtesy of the California Department of Food and Agriculture)

While you're peeling and segmenting your orange at breakfast or spooning orange honey on your toast, you're probably not thinking about the Asian citrus psyllid. But Mark Hoddle, Extension entomologist and director of the Center for Invasive...

The Asian citrus psyllid, about the size of an aphid, is a major threat to the multibillion dollar citrus industry in the United States.(Photo courtesy of the California Department of Food and Agriculture)
The Asian citrus psyllid, about the size of an aphid, is a major threat to the multibillion dollar citrus industry in the United States.(Photo courtesy of the California Department of Food and Agriculture)

The Asian citrus psyllid, about the size of an aphid, is a major threat to the multibillion dollar citrus industry in the United States.(Photo courtesy of the California Department of Food and Agriculture)

Mark Hoddle, Extension entomologist and director of the Center for Invasive Species Research at the University of California, Riverside,  will speak on “Protecting California Agriculture from Invasive Pests: Biocontrol of Asian Citrus Psyllid in Urban Southern California
Mark Hoddle, Extension entomologist and director of the Center for Invasive Species Research at the University of California, Riverside, will speak on “Protecting California Agriculture from Invasive Pests: Biocontrol of Asian Citrus Psyllid in Urban Southern California" on Sept. 26 at UC Davis. (Photo Courtesy of UC Riverside)

Mark Hoddle, Extension entomologist and director of the Center for Invasive Species Research at the University of California, Riverside, will speak on “Protecting California Agriculture from Invasive Pests: Biocontrol of Asian Citrus Psyllid in Urban Southern California" on Sept. 26 at UC Davis. (Photo Courtesy of UC Riverside)

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