Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: UC San Diego

Zeroing in on the Deadly Game Between Honey Bees and Their Predators

A crab spider nails a honey bee while another honey bee watches. This image, on bluebeard, Caryopteris x clandonensis, was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're around honey bees, you've seen their predators: crab spiders, orb weavers, praying mantids, birds and more. It's a tough world out there for pollinators. Take it from UC San Diego bee scientist James Nieh, who will be on the UC Davis campus...

A crab spider nails a honey bee while another honey bee watches. This image, on bluebeard, Caryopteris x clandonensis, was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider nails a honey bee while another honey bee watches. This image, on bluebeard, Caryopteris x clandonensis, was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider nails a honey bee while another honey bee watches. This image, on bluebeard, Caryopteris x clandonensis, was taken in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollinator Habitat: Important Part of Solar Energy Study

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy should not only be used to benefit global sustainability, but to protect our global ecological systems, including climate, air quality, water and wildlife, says an international team of 16 researchers, including several UC Davis scientists,...

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Africanized Bees: How Far North?

Collection of Africanized bee swarms can be an issue. These bees are European honey bees (not Africanized) that swarmed on the UC Davis North Hall/Dutton Hall complex in 2012. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Africanized honey bees arrived in southern California in 1994 and are expanding north. How far north are they now? That's the question being asked all over Central and Northern California, especially since "The Concord Incident" or what happened along...

Collection of Africanized bee swarms can be an issue. These bees are European honey bees (not Africanized) that swarmed on the UC Davis North Hall/Dutton Hall complex in 2012. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Collection of Africanized bee swarms can be an issue. These bees are European honey bees (not Africanized) that swarmed on the UC Davis North Hall/Dutton Hall complex in 2012. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Collection of Africanized bee swarms can be an issue. These bees are European honey bees (not Africanized) that swarmed on the UC Davis North Hall/Dutton Hall complex in 2012. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Scientists are studying feral colonies for Africanized bee expansion. This photo was taken in 2011 in a Vacaville backyard; the European honey bee colony was a joy to the homeowner until its collapse. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Scientists are studying feral colonies for Africanized bee expansion. This photo was taken in 2011 in a Vacaville backyard; the European honey bee colony was a joy to the homeowner until its collapse. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Scientists are studying feral colonies for Africanized bee expansion. This photo was taken in 2011 in a Vacaville backyard; the European honey bee colony was a joy to the homeowner until its collapse. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 16, 2016 at 4:28 PM
 
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