Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Agraulis vanillae

It's National Pollinator Week! See Any Butterflies?

A Gulf Fritillary, Argraulis vanillae, on pink mallow in Vacaville, Calif. Note its jagged wings: mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's National Pollinator Week! Do you know where your pollinators are? Or better yet, do you know how to attract them and protect them? Pollinator Partnership has announced that June 19-25 has been designated National Pollinator Week by the U.S....

A Gulf Fritillary, Argraulis vanillae, on pink mallow in Vacaville, Calif. Note its jagged wings: mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Argraulis vanillae, on pink mallow in Vacaville, Calif. Note its jagged wings: mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Argraulis vanillae, on pink mallow in Vacaville, Calif. Note its jagged wings: mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A mournful duskywing, Erynnis tristis suns itself on a butterfly bush. Note its jagged wings, the mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A mournful duskywing, Erynnis tristis suns itself on a butterfly bush. Note its jagged wings, the mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A mournful duskywing, Erynnis tristis suns itself on a butterfly bush. Note its jagged wings, the mark of a predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, lingering on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, lingering on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, lingering on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 19, 2017 at 5:14 PM

The Flora and the Fauna at the Old State Capitol

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Erected in 1852, this historic building was ostensibly intended for Benicia City Hall. Offered as the state capitol and promptly accepted, it had that honor from February 4, 1853 to February 25, 1854. Deeded to the state in 1951, it was one of the four...

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritilliary (Agraulis vanillae) nectars on lantana on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritilliary (Agraulis vanillae) nectars on lantana on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritilliary (Agraulis vanillae) nectars on lantana on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pomegranate tree with double-blossoms graces the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol and draws honey bees and other insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pomegranate tree with double-blossoms graces the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol and draws honey bees and other insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pomegranate tree with double-blossoms graces the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol and draws honey bees and other insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Benicia City Hall building was built in 1852, and served as the state capitol from Feb. 4, 1853 to Feb. 25, 1854. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Benicia City Hall building was built in 1852, and served as the state capitol from Feb. 4, 1853 to Feb. 25, 1854. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Benicia City Hall building was build in 1852, and served as the state capitol from Feb. 4, 1853 to Feb. 25, 1854. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 4:29 PM

Pollen Power

Gold dust? No, this is pollen covering the thorax of this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The conversation usually starts like this: "I saw this huge, huge bumble bee with yellow on its back. It was buzzing like crazy." Often it's not a bumble bee, but the Valley carpenter bee,  Xylocopa varipuncta, that's been foraging on the blooms...

Gold dust? No, this is pollen covering the thorax of this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gold dust? No, this is pollen covering the thorax of this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gold dust? No, this is pollen covering the thorax of this female Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollen from the passionflower vine is brushing against this  Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Pollen from the passionflower vine is brushing against this Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pollen from the passionflower vine is brushing against this Valley carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the Gulf Fritillary. Its host plant is the passionflower vine, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the Gulf Fritillary. Its host plant is the passionflower vine, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the Gulf Fritillary. Its host plant is the passionflower vine, Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 13, 2017 at 5:02 PM

Seconds Count When You're Photographing Butterflies

A mating pair of Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you're capturing images of butterflies, seconds count. They're unpredictable. They move from fluttering to fleeting. And just when you're focused on where they are, they aren't there anymore. Where'd they go? Oh, over there! Take the case of the...

A mating pair of Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A mating pair of Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A mating pair of Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The mating Gulf Frits react to a breeze. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The mating Gulf Frits react to a breeze. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The mating Gulf Frits react to a breeze. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Synchronized Gulf Fritillaries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Synchronized Gulf Fritillaries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Synchronized Gulf Fritillaries. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A territorial male Gulf Fritillary is just a blur as it heads over to the mating pair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A territorial male Gulf Fritillary is just a blur as it heads over to the mating pair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A territorial male Gulf Fritillary is just a blur as it heads over to the mating pair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 5:12 PM

And Along Came a Wasp...

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, attacks a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this cute little reddish/orangish caterpillar munching away on a passionflower vine. It's Sunday and he's having Sunday dinner--after having Sunday breakfast and lunch and snacks in between, thank you. He's on his way to becoming a Gulf...

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, attacks a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, attacks a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A European paper wasp, Polistes dominula, attacks a Gulf Fritillary caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The non-battle is over within seconds,as the wasp shreds the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The non-battle is over within seconds,as the wasp shreds the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The non-battle is over within seconds,as the wasp shreds the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trapeze style, the predator  devours its prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Trapeze style, the predator devours its prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trapeze style, the predator devours its prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European paper wasp finishes off the rest of the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European paper wasp finishes off the rest of the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European paper wasp finishes off the rest of the caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

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