Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: pollinator garden

Why Dead Bees Can Sting

A California scrub jay nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can dead bees sting? Yes, they can. Here's the scenario: Our pollinator garden is buzzing with the sights and sounds of honey bees.  Ah, spring! A few feet away, California scrub jays are nesting in the cherry laurel hedges. They leave periodically...

A California scrub jay nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A California scrub jay nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A California scrub jay nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The California scrub jay decapitates the honey bee, avoiding the abdomen with the stinger. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The California scrub jay decapitates the honey bee, avoiding the abdomen with the stinger. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The California scrub jay decapitates the honey bee, avoiding the abdomen with the stinger. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is what was left of the honey bee from the photos above. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is what was left of the honey bee from the photos above. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is what was left of the honey bee from the photos above. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On UC Davis Picnic Day, scrub jays had a picnic of their own in the author's yard, decapitating honey bees, and leaving behind the abdomens. Note the stingers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
On UC Davis Picnic Day, scrub jays had a picnic of their own in the author's yard, decapitating honey bees, and leaving behind the abdomens. Note the stingers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On UC Davis Picnic Day, scrub jays had a picnic of their own in the author's yard, decapitating honey bees, and leaving behind the abdomens. Note the stingers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 4:39 PM

It's Mine; Not Yours!

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this hungry male monarch butterfly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia "Torch"). He's sipping, sipping, sipping. He's minding his own business. He's tending to his own needs. It's a good day in the pollinator...

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm coming at you! The male Melissodes agilis returns to claim his territory. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm coming at you! The male Melissodes agilis returns to claim his territory. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm coming at you! The male Melissodes agilis returns to claim his territory. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, does a barrel roll and attempts again to push the monarch off the Mexican sunflower.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, does a barrel roll and attempts again to push the monarch off the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, does a barrel roll and attempts again to push the monarch off the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 6:01 PM

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