Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: sweat bee

Two Bees, Two Sizes

Two Bees

When a sweat bee and a honey bee share the same flower, the size difference is quite distinct.We took this photo of a honey bee on a rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora) blossom.  Above it stood a tiny female sweat bee (probably Halictus tripartitus,...

Two Bees
Two Bees

A HONEY BEE and a sweat bee share the same flower, a rock purslane. The sweat bee is probably Halictus tripartitus, according to native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 5, 2009 at 7:25 PM

Between a Rock and a...

Sweat Bee

Caught between a rock and a...soft place... You'll often see tiny sweat bees nectaring rock purslane (Calandrinia grandiflora) in urban gardens. This plant, a native of Chile, brightens landscapes with its pinkish magenta blossoms. You probably...

Sweat Bee
Sweat Bee

TINY female sweat bee (Halictus tripartitus) nectaring rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ready to Fly
Ready to Fly

IS IT SAFE? A tiny sweat bee peers from the rock purslane before she takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 8, 2009 at 6:02 PM

Sharing a Sunflower

Two on a Sunflower

If you're in the right spot at the same time, you may get a double bonus: a non-native bee and a native bee on a native plant.We took this photo in Healdsburg last week of a non-native bee (the common European or Western honey bee, Apis mellifera) and a...

Two on a Sunflower
Two on a Sunflower

TWO ON A SUNFLOWER--A honey bee (Apis mellifera) and a female sweat bee (Halictus ligatus) share a sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of a honey bee and a sweat bee clearly illustrates the size disparity. The honey bee is covered with pollen from a nearby hollyhock. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 26, 2009 at 8:10 PM
Tags: Apis mellifera (20), Halictus ligatus (5), honey bee (195), sunflower (2), sweat bee (18)

Squatters' Rights

Fly-In

Squatters' rights. A dandelion poking through the rocks near Nick's Cove on Tomales Bay, in Marshall, Sonoma County, seemed an unlikely host for squatters' rights. It first drew a tiny bee, barely a quarter-inch long. It was a female sweat bee, family...

Fly-In
Fly-In

HOVER FLY, from the family Syrphidae swoops down on a dandelion claimed by a sweat bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two's Company
Two's Company

TWO'S COMPANY--A tiny sweat bee and a hover fly share the same dandelion. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On the Rim
On the Rim

POLLEN-PACKING sweat bee (top) prepares to leave the dandelion to the much larger hover fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Alone
Alone

ALONE, the hover fly nectars the dandelion flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 24, 2009 at 5:39 PM
Tags: dandelion (1), hover fly (19), Lasioglossum (6), Sonoma County (2), sweat bee (18), Syrphidae (8)

Ogling the Agapanthus

Sweat Bee

Seems like many folks assume that all bees are "honey bees." They're not. If you look around you, you'll see bees of all shapes, colors and sizes nectaring flowers. And they're not all honey bees (Apis mellifera)! The one below, as identified by...

Sweat Bee
Sweat Bee

NATIVE BEE, a sweat bee (Halictus ligatus) nectars Agapanthus. This is a ground-nesting bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 24, 2009 at 6:22 PM

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