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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: monarch butterfly

From an Egg to a Caterpillar to a Chrysalis to a Monarch

A monarch laying an egg on her host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) lay an egg on her host plant, the milkweed? Have you ever seen a close-up of the egg? The larva or caterpillar? The chrysalis? The eclosure (when the adult emerges from the...

A monarch laying an egg on her host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch laying an egg on her host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch laying an egg on her host plant, milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a cream-colored monarch egg. Note the oleander or milkweed aphid next to it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a cream-colored monarch egg. Note the oleander or milkweed aphid next to it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a cream-colored monarch egg. Note the oleander or milkweed aphid next to it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A very tiny caterpillar but it's big enough to start eating holes in the leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A very tiny caterpillar but it's big enough to start eating holes in the leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A very tiny caterpillar but it's big enough to start eating holes in the leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A fifth-instar monarch caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A fifth-instar monarch caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A fifth-instar monarch caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jade green chrysalid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The jade green chrysalid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The jade green chrysalid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Voila! A monarch butterfly has just eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Voila! A monarch butterfly has just eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Voila! A monarch butterfly has just eclosed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2015 at 8:47 PM
Tags: adult (6), caterpillar (14), eclosure (4), egg (9), larva (4), monarch butterfly (21), Sal Levinson (3), USDA Forest Service (3)

Go West, Young Monarch, Go West!

A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Westward, ho! The western migration of the Monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus)  to their overwintering sites along the California coast is underway. Butterfly expert Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at the...

A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Monarch nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of the Monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of the Monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch gets ready for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch gets ready for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch gets ready for flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 14, 2014 at 5:37 PM

Bring Back the Monarchs!

Backlit, the monarch resembles a stained glass window as it touches down on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When a monarch butterfly comes fluttering through your yard, grab your camera. Marvel at it beauty, celebrate its presence, and keep it in your memory. It may be become an endangered species the way things are going. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate...

Backlit, the monarch resembles a stained glass window as it touches down on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Backlit, the monarch resembles a stained glass window as it touches down on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Backlit, the monarch resembles a stained glass window as it touches down on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of a monarch on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of a monarch on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of a monarch on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch spreads its wings, a glorious sight, even as the afternoon light fades. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch spreads its wings, a glorious sight, even as the afternoon light fades. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch spreads its wings, a glorious sight, even as the afternoon light fades. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, September 17, 2014 at 5:28 AM

Tithonia: What a Draw!

A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, dive-bombs a bumble bee, Bombus fervides. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you have Mexican sunflowers (genus Tithonia) in your garden, you can expect a diversity of insects--and not just honey bees. Lately we've been photographing all the insects that visit the Tithonia in our bee garden. They include butterflies...

A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, dive-bombs a bumble bee, Bombus fervides. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, dive-bombs a bumble bee, Bombus fervides. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, dive-bombs a bumble bee, Bombus fervides. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae, takes flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) foraging on the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) foraging on the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) foraging on the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A skipper takes a liking to the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A skipper takes a liking to the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A skipper takes a liking to the Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This fly is a pollinator, too! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This fly is a pollinator, too! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This fly is a pollinator, too! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 16, 2014 at 10:22 PM

Make Way for the Monarchs

A monarch butterfly on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's good to see so many scientists and citizen scientists taking an avid interest in monarchs. The monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), probably the most recognizable of all the butterflies, is known for its long migratory route from Canada to Mexico....

A monarch butterfly on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A monarch butterfly on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch butterfly on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly finds just the right blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterfly finds just the right blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly finds just the right blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At times, the monarch resembles a strained glass window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
At times, the monarch resembles a strained glass window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

At times, the monarch resembles a strained glass window. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 8:20 PM

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