Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Lynn Kimsey

Assassins in the Tidy Tips

Patch of Tidy Tips

If you see a patch of California native wildflowers known as "Tidy Tips,"  look closely. The yellow daisylike flower with white petals (Layia platyglossa) may yield a surprise visitor. You may see an assassin. An assassin bug. A member of the family...

Patch of Tidy Tips
Patch of Tidy Tips

PATCH OF TIDY TIPS, California native wildflower, planted on the UC Davis campus, behind the Laboratory Sciences Building. If you look closely in the patch, you'll see scores of insects, including honey bees, hover flies, mason bees, ladybugs--and assassin bugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin Bug
Assassin Bug

ASSASSIN BUG, from the genus Zelus and family Reduviidae, waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sip of Nectar
Sip of Nectar

ASSASSIN BUG appears to be sipping nectar from a tidy tip blossom for a quick burst of energy. It preys on small insects, such as aphids, crickets and leafhoppers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2010 at 6:39 PM
Tags: assassin bug (6), Lynn Kimsey (240), Reduviidae (2), Steve Heydon (36), tidy tips (3), Zelus (1)

Going Green

Green Walking Stick

What has six legs and is green all over? If you think like an entomologist, that's easy. Walking sticks, walking leaves, mantids, crickets and grasshoppers...The Bohart Museum of Entomology, which houses more than seven million specimens--plus a...

Green Walking Stick
Green Walking Stick

THIS KELLY GREEN walking stick is the impetus behind the Bohart Museum's special theme, "What Has Six Legs and Is Green All Over?" The Bohart will focus on what's green from 1 to 5 p.m., Sunday, March 21 in a special St. Paddy's Day theme. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tabatha Yang
Tabatha Yang

TABATHA YANG, education and outreach coordinator at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, with assorted walking sticks. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 11, 2010 at 5:20 PM

Going Buggy

Praying Mantis

Let's go buggy at the Bohart!The Bohart Museum of Entomology, which houses more than seven million insect specimens at its facility on the University of California, Davis campus, has extended its hours to include several weekends.The first will be...

Praying Mantis
Praying Mantis

THIS PRAYING MANTIS gets lots of attention at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Emily and the Tiger
Emily and the Tiger

FIRST-YEAR GRADUATE STUDENT Emily Bzdyk, UC Davis Department of Entomology, with a tiger hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina grandidieri), native to Madagascar. The "tiger" is one of the live insects at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, February 9, 2010 at 6:32 PM

Hissers in the Bohart

Different Reactions

It’s a comfortable life. Eat, sleep and mate. And then eat, sleep and mate again. Madagascar hissing cockroaches are a popular attraction at the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the University of California, Davis. The museum, directed by entomologist...

Different Reactions
Different Reactions

UC DAVIS graduate students Emily Bzdyk (left) and Fran Keller show different reactions to the cockroaches at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Keller admits to liking other insects better; she's working on beetles for her doctorate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bigger than Big
Bigger than Big

MADAGASCAR HISSING COCKROACH, aka "hisser," is bigger than big. It can reach three inches in length. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 29, 2010 at 8:49 PM

If Bugs Ruled the World...

Interview

Can you imagine a world without people? What  it would look like? Check out the Life After People series airing on the History Channel. Next week the series will include the segment, "The Last Supper" and include an interview with entomologist Lynn...

Interview
Interview

ENTOMOLOGIST Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor and vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, readies for an interview with "Life After People." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee and Honey
Bee and Honey

HONEY is one of the oldest foods in existence. Jars of honey, as old as 3,300 years, have been found in Egyptian tombs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 20, 2010 at 6:05 PM

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