Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

UC Blogs

Tea for Two

Leptospermum

In a way, it's "tea for two."The New Zealand tea tree, Leptospermum scoparium, aka "manuka," "tea tree," and "Leptospermum," is a favorite of the light brown apple moth AND honey bees.We captured images of bees on Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi recently...

Leptospermum
Leptospermum

HONEY BEE heads for a Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi, also known as a "royal pink manuka." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of a honey bee nectaring a Leptospermum scoparium keatleyi, or "royal pink manuka." The Leptospermum scoparium is also known as a tea tree; Capt. Cook used to make tea from the leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, November 24, 2009 at 5:18 PM

Guess Who Came to Dinner?

Aphids and Honey Bee

Picture this. A light rainstorm strikes the garden, pummeling and shredding some of the blossoms. As the rain lets up, a honey bee buzzes into a rock purslane blossom for a sweet shot of nectar. She is not alone. If you look closely, you'll see three...

Aphids and Honey Bee
Aphids and Honey Bee

THREE GREEN APHIDS are sucking plant juices from a rock purslane, while a honey bee is sipping nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 23, 2009 at 6:55 PM

Native Bee Calendar Focuses on 'Pin-Up Girls'--and Boys

Spectacular Photography

Humans aren't the only calendar pin-up models. Think native bees. Think the 2010 Native Bees Calendar. The Xerces Society and the Great Sunflower Project have joined forces to produce a calendar showcasing 12 commonly found native bees. You'll be...

Spectacular Photography
Spectacular Photography

SPECTACULAR PHOTOGRAPHY of entomologist Rollin Coville, who received his doctorate in entomology from UC Berkeley, graces the 2010 Native Bees Calendar, a fundraising project of the Xerces Society and the Great Sunflower Project. (Photos courtesy of Rollin Coville)

Posted on Friday, November 20, 2009 at 7:05 PM

What's Bugging the Ladybug?

Ladybug

It probably bugs her but it doesn't kill her. But why? An entomologist at the University of Montreal is investigating why parasitic wasps (Dinocampus coccinellae) that lay their eggs on ladybugs (Coccinella maculata) do not kill them. Often a...

Ladybug
Ladybug

LADYBUG crawls on a leaf at the UC Berkeley Botanical Garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up
Close-up

CLOSE-UP of a ladybug in Vacaville, Calif., eating aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Searching for More Aphids
Searching for More Aphids

LADYBUG searching for more aphids. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, November 19, 2009 at 5:55 PM

Waist Not, Want Not

Yellow-legged paper wasp

A buggy thing happened on the way to a meeting. As we left Briggs Hall, a three-story building on the UC Davis campus that houses the Department of Entomology, we noticed a wasp at our feet. Entomologists warn against collecting biting and stinging...

Yellow-legged paper wasp
Yellow-legged paper wasp

SLOW-MOVING yellow-legged paper wasp, Mischocyttarus flavitarsis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wasp Waist
Wasp Waist

WASP WAIST of a male Mischocyttarus flavitarsis, aka yellow-legged wasp. Note the wings moving; he is crawling inside a jar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

MALE yellow-legged wasp moves toward the photographer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 18, 2009 at 5:45 PM

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu