Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

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The Buzz on the State Capitol Lawn

California Agriculture Day

When the annual California Agriculture Day took place yesterday on the state capitol grounds, thousands of visitors buzzed the booths learning more about the food they eat and the agriculturists that provide it.But that wasn't the only buzz.The...

California Agriculture Day
California Agriculture Day

CALIFORNIA SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE A. G. Kawamura (center) greets Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology and professor and vice chair of the UC Davis Department of Entomology. At right is Extension apiculturist Eric Mussen, also a member of the UC Davis entomology faculty and parliamentarian of the California State Beekeepers' Association. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Fascination
Fascination

BEEKEEPER Brian Fishback (right) of Wilton, president of the Sacramento Area Beekeepers’ Association, points out the queen, worker bees (sterile females) and the drones (males) to the visitors. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Government Officials
Government Officials

CALIFORNIA Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (center) and California Secretary of Agriculture A. G. Kawamura (right) listen to beekeeper Brian Fishback talk about the declining bee population. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bee Observation Hive
Bee Observation Hive

GLASSED-IN bee observation hive at the California Agriculture Day, held March 23 on the state capitol grounds, was a big attraction. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Pain in the Neck

Varroa Mite

To a beekeeper, it's a four-letter word. Mite. Specifically, the varroa mite, also known as Varroa destructor. It's a small (think flea-sized) crab-shaped parasite that feeds on bees, either in the brood (immature bees) or on adult bees. Extension...

Varroa Mite
Varroa Mite

VARROA MITE on a worker bee (see crab-shaped parasite near her head). These undertaker bees were trying to remove a drone larva from the hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mite on Pupa
Mite on Pupa

VARROA mite is quite visible on this honey bee pupa. It's a blood-sucking parasite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, March 23, 2010 at 8:09 PM

Sugar High

Blue on Green

Honey bees sip nectar from the Mediterranean spurge (Euphorbia characias wulfenii) planted in our bee friendly garden. So do flies. Last weekend several flies flashing colors as brilliant as those blue morpho butterflies landed on the evergreen...

Blue on Green
Blue on Green

BLUE ON GREEN--A blue bottle fly (Calliphora vicinia) lands on the Mediterranean spurge (Euphorbia characias wulfenii). This species is important in forensic entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue Abdomen
Blue Abdomen

SHOWING BLUE--The blue bottle fly is distinguished by the metallic blue-silvery gray coloring on its thorax and abdomen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sip of Nectar
Sip of Nectar

SIP OF NECTAR--A European blue bottle fly prepares to sip nectar from a Mediterranean spurge (Euphorbia characias wulfenii), a plant native to Greece and Turkey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, March 22, 2010 at 7:18 PM

If I Had a Hammer...

Queen Bee

The number of new housing developments throughout the country continues to shrink as we struggle with the throes of a deep recession. That's with human housing, not in a healthy honey bee hive. The bees are busy building up their colonies, just as they...

Queen Bee
Queen Bee

QUEEN BEE (with the dot) is surrounded by worker bees (sterile females). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Line-Up
Line-Up

WORKER BEES are lined up in perfect formation as they tend to the queen bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Inspecting a Cell
Inspecting a Cell

QUEEN BEE pokes her head in a cell before laying an egg in it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 19, 2010 at 6:50 PM

Assassins in the Tidy Tips

Patch of Tidy Tips

If you see a patch of California native wildflowers known as "Tidy Tips,"  look closely. The yellow daisylike flower with white petals (Layia platyglossa) may yield a surprise visitor. You may see an assassin. An assassin bug. A member of the family...

Patch of Tidy Tips
Patch of Tidy Tips

PATCH OF TIDY TIPS, California native wildflower, planted on the UC Davis campus, behind the Laboratory Sciences Building. If you look closely in the patch, you'll see scores of insects, including honey bees, hover flies, mason bees, ladybugs--and assassin bugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin Bug
Assassin Bug

ASSASSIN BUG, from the genus Zelus and family Reduviidae, waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sip of Nectar
Sip of Nectar

ASSASSIN BUG appears to be sipping nectar from a tidy tip blossom for a quick burst of energy. It preys on small insects, such as aphids, crickets and leafhoppers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2010 at 6:39 PM
Tags: assassin bug (8), Lynn Kimsey (270), Reduviidae (2), Steve Heydon (43), tidy tips (4), Zelus (1)

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