Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

UC Blogs

Well Said

Michael

UC Davis bee specialists were well represented in a recent edition of The IPM Practitioner, which landed on our desk last week.   The edition, devoted to “Pesticides and Honey...

Michael
Michael "Kim" Fondrk

TENDING BEES--Michael "Kim" Fondrk of UC Davis tends his bees in a Dixon almond orchard. This photo appeared in The IPM Practitioner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Susan Cobey
Susan Cobey

CHECKING THE FRAME--UC Davis bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey checks the health of a frame of bees. This photo appeared in The IPM Practitioner. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 28, 2009 at 4:41 PM

Golden Moments

SIX-PETALED FLOWER

It blooms in winter and the bees love it.  Winter jasmine (Jasminum nudiflorum), a rambling vine with trumpetlike yellow flowers, is charming visitors in the Storer Gardens at the University of California, Davis. The plant originates from western...

SIX-PETALED FLOWER
SIX-PETALED FLOWER

SIX-PETALED FLOWER--A honey bee forages on a winter jasmine in the Storer Gardens, University of California, Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

BEE HUG
BEE HUG

BEE HUG--If there ever were a "bee hug," this is it. This honey bee is totally wrapped around the winter jasmine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

BEE IN BLOSSOM
BEE IN BLOSSOM

BEE IN BLOSSOM--A honey bee checks out the winter jasmine in the Storer Gardens on Jan. 24, 2009 at the University of California, Davis. Note the golden pollen on her leg.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

HEAD FIRST
HEAD FIRST

HEAD FIRST--Oblivious to everything but the blossom of this winter jasmine, a pollen-packing honey bee dives in. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 at 4:52 PM

Just Wanna Be Your 'Teddy Bear'

Green Eyes

When you think of a teddy bear, you think of a huggable stuffed animal. Not so entomologists. When they think of a teddy bear, they think of the male Valley carpenter bee. It's a green-eyed, fluffy golden insect that's nicknamed "teddy...

Green Eyes
Green Eyes

GREEN EYES--The male Valley carpenter bee is a green-eyed, golden insect nicknamed the "teddy bear" carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ferocious?
Ferocious?

FEROCIOUS? No. The male Valley carpenter bee doesn't sting. The female is black, and the male is golden.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brian Turner
Brian Turner

CHUNK OF WOOD--Brian Turner, public outreach coordinator at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, shows a chunk of wood swarming with Valley carpenter bees (males). The females are black and the males are a golden hue with green eyes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 26, 2009 at 4:43 PM

Art Show: A Fusion of Art and Science

Red Dragonfly

If you like to combine art with science, here you go.   In keeping with the theme, “The Consilience of Art And Science," the Pence Gallery and the UC Davis Art/Science...

Red Dragonfly
Red Dragonfly

RED DRAGONFLY--UC Davis entomologist Michael Parrella submitted this photograph in the Insect Salon juried photography show at the Entomological Society of America's 56th annual meeting, held last November in Reno. Photographers from around the world entered the competition. Parrella is an associate dean of agricultural sciences at the UC Davis College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and professor of entomology and environmental horticulture at UC Davis. (Photo by Michael Parrella)

Silver Wings
Silver Wings

SILVER WINGS--UC Davis entomologist Michael Parrella submitted this striking photo of a silver-winged dragonfly in the Insect Salon juried photography show at the Entomological Society of America's 56th annual meeting, held last November in Reno. Parrella and UC Davis entomologist Frank Zalom were named ESA Fellows at the meeting. (Photo by Michael Parrella)

Cuckoo Bee
Cuckoo Bee

CUCKOO BEE--This photo of a cuckoo bee, taken by Kathy Keatley Garvey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology, was accepted into the international Insect Salon juried show and exhibited at the Entomological Society of America's 56th annual meeting in Reno. She titled it: "Watch Out Below!"

Posted on Friday, January 23, 2009 at 5:37 PM

What We Learn from the Insects

Heart Researchers

Call it serendipity. Call it a major collaborative effort. Call it a keen eye for science. Whatever you call it, research that sprang from studies on insect pest control in the...

Heart Researchers
Heart Researchers

Bruce Hammock and Nipavan Chiamvimonvat look at enzyme distribution in a heart muscle cell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 22, 2009 at 5:01 PM

First storyPrevious 5 stories  |  Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu