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Another Good Reason

The Ladybug

Here’s another good reason to be kind to ladybugs.     But we are, aren’t we?   EurekAlert! alerted us Jan. 6 to a study relating that an abundance of ladybugs in olive orchards is an...

The Ladybug
The Ladybug

THE LADYBUG--The ladybug is an indicator of health and sustainability in olive orchards, scientists in Spain have found. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, January 9, 2009 at 5:02 PM

The Insect We Love to Hate

At the Reception

Catherine Chalmers hates cockroaches. She said so at her presentation Wednesday night, Jan. 7, at UC Davis. The occasion:  “The Consilience of Art and Science centennial colloquium,...

At the Reception
At the Reception

AT THE RECEPTION--From left are entomologist Diane Ullman, associate dean of Undergraduate Academic Programs, College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, and co-director of the UC Davis Art/Science Fusion experimental learning program; artist Catherine Chalmers; and UC Davis Department of Art faculty members Matthias Geiger and Darrin Martin. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, January 8, 2009 at 6:51 PM

Aw, Nuts!

Larvae Inside Walnut

Walnuts are packed with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, right? Right. And sometimes a little protein. Protein, as in larvae. That's not a welcome sight. Sometimes you'll find two or three navel orangeworm (NOW) larvae inside a single walnut,...

Larvae Inside Walnut
Larvae Inside Walnut

LARVAE INSIDE WALNUT--This fallen walnut contained three larvae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In a Nutshell
In a Nutshell

IN A NUTSHELL!--Close-up of larva inside a walnut. You can tell if it's a navel orangeworm (NOW) if it has a crescent-shaped marking on the sides of the second segment behind the head, says UC Davis entomologist Frank Zalom. Often, with NOW, there are two or more larvae inside a single nut. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, January 7, 2009 at 5:00 PM
Tags: larvae (2), navel orangeworm (3), walnuts (1)

Back to UC Davis

Louie Yang

DAVIS—He's back. Entomology folks at UC Davis remember when Louie Yang was a doctoral candidate, studying population biology with major professor Rick Karban. Yang received his doctorate in 2006 and then became a UC President's...

Louie Yang
Louie Yang

BACK TO UC DAVIS--After receiving his doctorate in population biology at UC Davis in 2006 and then serving as a UC President's Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Ecology, Evolution and Marine Biology at UC Santa Barbara, Louie Yang is back at UC Davis. He joined the Department of Entomology faculty on Jan. 2. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, January 6, 2009 at 5:52 PM

The L-Bug

The Ladybug

There she was, snuggled beneath a garbage can lid, seeking warmth as temperatures dipped to freezing levels. She was lucky. It was City Garbage Pick-Up Day. She could have been trucked to the local landfill had we not rescued her. Luck be a lady and...

The Ladybug
The Ladybug

LUCKY BUG--This ladybug soaks up sunshine after being discovered in a garbage can. Her two-legged rescuers saved her from a trip to the landfill.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

On the Move
On the Move

ON THE MOVE--The ladybug, her legs a blur, heads out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off and Running
Off and Running

OFF AND RUNNING--The ladybug scrambles away to live another day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 5, 2009 at 4:59 PM
Tags: lady beetle (16), ladybug (20)

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