Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

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Mighty Mite

Mite on drone

It's a mighty mite and it's causing beekeepers fits. The varroa mite (see photo below) is an external parasite that attacks honey bees. It sucks blood from the adults (apparently preferring drones, the male bees) and from the brood (immature...

Mite on drone
Mite on drone

A female varroa mite on a drone (male bee). The mite is the reddish-brown parasite on the bee's thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eric Mussen with panel of bees
Eric Mussen with panel of bees

Eric Mussen, UC Davis apiculturist, with a panel of bees at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 4, 2008 at 5:00 PM
Tags: bee mite (1), Eric Mussen (245), honey bees (341), varroa mite (13)

Teacher Extraordinaire

Fran Keller

Okay, be honest. If you were attending class at 7:30 a.m., could you get excited about flies? No? How about the gender differences? Still no? You would if Mary Frances “Fran” Keller were there teaching you. You won’t find anyone more...

Fran Keller
Fran Keller

Fran Keller is an enthusiastic entomologist and an outstanding teacher. Plus, she's an accomplished artist, illustrator, and a nature and insect photographer.

Halictid bee
Halictid bee

Fran Keller captured this photo of a halictid bee on Borrichia (seaside tansy). It's included in her Bahamas gallery on her Web site at www.tenebrionid.net.

buprestid beetle
buprestid beetle

This is a robber fly with a buprestid beetle on a creosote bush branch in the Algodones Dunes. Fran Keller took this photo and "suffered multiple spines from prickly flowers and sand temperatures of 130 degrees, but it was worth it."

Fran Keller and daughter Rachael
Fran Keller and daughter Rachael

Entomologist Fran Keller (left) and daughter Rachael deVries share a hug on the beach after Fran's recent wedding to entomologist Pat Randolph. Yes, Fran collected insects along the beach. (Photo by Cory Unruh)

Posted on Wednesday, September 3, 2008 at 3:11 PM

Gollywhoppers in Love

Close-up of crane fly

He didn't bring her flowers. They were already sharing a sunflower leaf. He didn't bring her candy. They'd already dined on nectar. It was Labor Day and the two crane flies looked quite friendly in our bee friendly garden. More than friendly. I...

Close-up of crane fly
Close-up of crane fly

The crane fly is sometimes called a mosquito hawk or a gollywhopper.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In love
In love

These two crane flies, also known as mosquito hawks, are in love. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 2, 2008 at 2:18 PM

Ain't No Moths on Me

Light brown apple moth, female

Bam! LBAM is back in the news. The California Department of Food and Agriculture announced Aug. 29 that it has established a 19-square-mile quarantine straddling portions of two counties after the light brown apple moth (LBAM) was found July 23 in Napa...

Light brown apple moth, female
Light brown apple moth, female

(Photo courtesy of David Williams, principal scientist, Perennial Horticulture, Department of Primary Industries, Victoria, Australia.)

Light brown apple moth, male
Light brown apple moth, male

(Photo courtesy of David Williams, principal scientist, Perennial Horticulture, Department of Primary Industries, Victoria, Australia.)

Larva of the light brown apple moth
Larva of the light brown apple moth

(Photo courtesy of David Williams, principal scientist, Perennial Horticulture, Department of Primary Industries, Victoria, Australia.)

Posted on Monday, September 1, 2008 at 5:40 PM

Big on Butterflies

Feline entomologist

Our cat is an entomologist. She has no formal training in the science of insects, but she can catch insects with the best of 'em. Plus, her credentials include a butterfly mark on her leg. Xena the Warrior Princess is a rescue cat. We first spotted her...

Feline entomologist
Feline entomologist

Xena the Warrior Princess is a feline entomologist. She specializes in butterflies and sphinx moths. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sphinx moth
Sphinx moth

Our feline entomologist collects moths. This is probably a sphinx moth, the adult form of the tomato hornworm (Manduca sexta (Linnaeus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly mark
Butterfly mark

Xena the Warrior Princess sports a butterfly mark on her leg, credentials certifying her as a feline entomologist. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 29, 2008 at 1:19 PM

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