Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Mexican sunflower

The Monarch and the Melissodes

A male sunflower bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "The Battle Over the Tithonia." A female monarch butterfly--gender identified by butterfly expert Art Shapiro, professor of evolution and ecology at the University of California, Davis and Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of...

Posted on Monday, July 14, 2014 at 10:00 PM

Watch Out, Below!

A male sunflower bee, Melissodes agilis, keeps a wary eye out as she forages on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Summertime, and the livin' is easy," belted out Ella Fitzgerald. She wasn't singing about bees, but she could have been. Summertime, and the livin' is easy Fish are jumpin' and the cotton is high Oh, your daddy's rich and your ma is good-lookin' So...

Posted on Thursday, July 3, 2014 at 8:30 PM

Faster Than a Speeding Bullet

A Gulf Fritillary sips nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia), unaware of what will soon occur. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterflies flutter.  Bees don't. Indeed, some bees seem to possess Superman's extraordinary power of "faster than a speeding bullet."  They're just lacking a blue costume, a red cape and an "S" on their thorax. The butterfly doing the...

Posted on Wednesday, June 25, 2014 at 5:59 PM

Touchdown! At Last!

Gulf fritillary butterfly. Agraulis vanillae, lands on Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

For months, I've been waiting ah, so patiently (well, not always s-o-o-o patiently) for the gulf fritillary butterfly to touch down on our Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. A perfect match, I figured. The showy reddish-orange butterfly (Agraulis...

Posted on Monday, July 22, 2013 at 10:02 PM

Lying in Wait

Crab spider on a Mexican sunflower, Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They're ambush predators. Here you are, a bee, touching down on a flower and little do you know there's a patient and persistent crab spider lying in wait.  Sometimes they're camouflaged, matching the color of a blossom, like a yellow crab spider...

Posted on Thursday, July 11, 2013 at 9:58 PM
Tags: crab spider (2), Mexican sunflower (33), Tithonia (31)

First storyPrevious 5 stories

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu