Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Jeff Smith

Bugs Galore at Dixon May Fair

Sharon Payne, superintendent of the Today's Youth Building at the Dixon May Fair, stands by a 6-year-old's bug exhibit, which won a blue ribbon and best of show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There are bugs galore at the Dixon May Fair, which opened today (Thursday, May 8) and continues through Sunday, May 11. The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is showcasing insects in the Floriculture Building, where displays include a bee...

Sharon Payne, superintendent of the Today's Youth Building at the Dixon May Fair, stands by a 6-year-old's bug exhibit, which won a blue ribbon and best of show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sharon Payne, superintendent of the Today's Youth Building at the Dixon May Fair, stands by a 6-year-old's bug exhibit, which won a blue ribbon and best of show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sharon Payne, superintendent of the Today's Youth Building at the Dixon May Fair, stands by a 6-year-old's bug exhibit, which won a blue ribbon and best of show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Amina Harris, director of the Honey and Pollination Center, will engage youngsters in arts and crafts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Amina Harris, director of the Honey and Pollination Center, will engage youngsters in arts and crafts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Amina Harris, director of the Honey and Pollination Center, will engage youngsters in arts and crafts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Entomologist Jeff Smith of the Bohart Museum of Entomology will show fairgoers his rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith of the Bohart Museum of Entomology will show fairgoers his rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith of the Bohart Museum of Entomology will show fairgoers his rose-haired tarantula. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Posted on Thursday, May 8, 2014 at 7:26 PM
Tags: Amina Harris (64), Billy Synk (10), bugs (12), Cameron Jasper (2), Dixon May Fair (17), insects (50), Jeff Smith (35)

What's Mother's Day Without Moths?

Entomologist/Bohart associate Jeff Smith will be there to answer questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's Mother's Day without moths?And caterpillars?  Moth specimens and a fun caterpillar craft activity will highlight a pre-“Moth’er's Day” open house from 1 to 4 p.m., Saturday, May 12 at the Bohart Museum of...

Entomologist/Bohart associate Jeff Smith will be there to answer questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist/Bohart associate Jeff Smith will be there to answer questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist/Bohart associate Jeff Smith will be there to answer questions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the caterpillar (larval stage) of the anise swallowtail. Bohart Museum visitors can make (free) colorful paper/chopstick caterpillar crafts on May 12.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is the caterpillar (larval stage) of the anise swallowtail. Bohart Museum visitors can make (free) colorful paper/chopstick caterpillar crafts on May 12. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is the caterpillar (larval stage) of the anise swallowtail. Bohart Museum visitors can make (free) colorful paper/chopstick caterpillar crafts on May 12. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 7, 2012 at 9:33 PM

Don't Let the Bedbugs Bite

Bedbug

Forensic entomologist Bob Kimsey (right) of the Department of Entomology, University of California, Davis, studies bedbugs--those little bloodsuckers that prey on you while you're sleeping. There's an "alarming resurgence in the population of...

Bedbug
Bedbug

BEDBUG--"Bed bugs are small, flat insects that feed on the blood of sleeping people and animals," according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "They are reddish-brown in color, wingless, and range from 1 to 7 millimeters in length. They can live several months without a blood meal." (CDC Photo)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of bedbug. "Bed bugs are experts at hiding," according to the CDC. "They hide during the day in places such as seams of mattresses, box springs, bed frames, headboards, dresser tables, cracks or crevices, behind wallpaper, and under any clutter or objects around a bed. Their small flat bodies allow them to fit into the smallest of spaces and they can remain in place for long periods of time, even without a blood meal. Bed bugs can travel over 100 feet in one night, but they tend to live within 8 feet of where people sleep." (CDC Photo)

Posted on Monday, December 6, 2010 at 6:13 PM

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