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Congratulations to UC Davis Pollinator Ecologist Neal Williams

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

With all the increasing--and alarming--global concern about declining pollinators, it's great to see some good news: pollination ecologist Neal Williams of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is one of the Highly Cited Researchers in the...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, heading toward a California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Neal Williams working on his native bee research at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Neal Williams working on his native bee research at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Neal Williams working on his native bee research at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When Queen Bees Get Permanents: Calendar That!

A UC Davis student wrote:

"Drones are male bees that contribute only in the perm production for the queen." So wrote an undergraduate student in one of Lynn Kimsey's entomology classes at the University of California, Davis. The student meant "sperm." But it came out...

A UC Davis student wrote:
A UC Davis student wrote: "Drones are male bees that contribute only in the perm production for the queen." That inspired Karissa Merritt to create this for the newly published Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar, now available for purchase.

A UC Davis student wrote: "Drones are male bees that contribute only in the perm production for the queen." That inspired Karissa Merritt to create this for the newly published Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar, now available for purchase.

“The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings,
“The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings," a UC Davis student wrote about mayflies. The result: this illustration by Karissa Merritt for the Bohart Museum of Entomology's innovative calendar.

“The swarmers are attracted to lights and tend to expose themselves in the evenings," a UC Davis student wrote about mayflies. The result: this illustration by Karissa Merritt for the Bohart Museum of Entomology's innovative calendar.


"The infected fleas can harbor rats, ground squirrels, rabbits, and occasionally, even house cats," wrote a UC Davis student. The result: this illustration by Karissa Merritt for the Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar.

"The infected fleas can harbor rats, ground squirrels, rabbits, and occasionally, even house cats," wrote a UC Davis student. The result: this illustration by Karissa Merritt for the Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar.

Displaying the innovative Bohart Museum calendars are museum associates and the director. From left are UC Davis entomology student Abram Estrada; intern Sophia Lonchar of The Met High School, Sacramento; Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey; UC Davis entomology student Wade Spencer, and Bohart scientist Brennen Dyer, a recent entomology graduate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Displaying the innovative Bohart Museum calendars are museum associates and the director. From left are UC Davis entomology student Abram Estrada; intern Sophia Lonchar of The Met High School, Sacramento; Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey; UC Davis entomology student Wade Spencer, and Bohart scientist Brennen Dyer, a recent entomology graduate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Displaying the innovative Bohart Museum calendars are museum associates and the director. From left are UC Davis entomology student Abram Estrada; intern Sophia Lonchar of The Met High School, Sacramento; Bohart Museum director Lynn Kimsey; UC Davis entomology student Wade Spencer, and Bohart scientist Brennen Dyer, a recent entomology graduate. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 6, 2018 at 5:45 PM

Scientists Reveal New Method to Characterize Physiological Responses to Parasitism

A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)

Have you ever seen a wasp oviposit or lay its eggs inside a caterpillar? Or the egg of a moth? it's not always easy to tell what's going on without destroying both species. But newly published research by UC Davis agricultural entomologist Christian...

A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)
A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)

A parasitic wasp, Microplitis demolitor, laying an egg (ovipositing) in larva of soybean looper moth. (Photo by Jena Johnson of the Michael Strand lab, University of Georgia)

Posted on Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at 6:17 PM

About That Three-Cornered Alfalfa Hopper...

The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's green, it's tiny, and everyone is hoping it doesn't wreak any havoc in the vineyards. "It" is the three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus, a lear-winged, wedge-shaped (thus the name "three-cornered") insect that's about a quarter of an...

The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus, is a clear-winged, wedge-shaped (thus the name
The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus, is a clear-winged, wedge-shaped (thus the name "three-cornered") insect that's about a quarter of an inch long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The three-cornered alfalfa hopper, Spissistilus festinus, is a clear-winged, wedge-shaped (thus the name "three-cornered") insect that's about a quarter of an inch long. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 4, 2018 at 7:35 PM
Tags: Cindy Preto (3), ESA (10), Frank Zalom (41), Mysore (1)

Shedding New Light on Honey Bee Chromosomes

Honey bee geneticists with long ties to UC Davis are putting together those missing pieces of the puzzle involving bee chromosomes. Newly published research by a team of Germany-based honey bee geneticists, collaborating with Robert Eugene...


"The honey bee genome,” Robert Page Jr. explained, “is composed of about 15,000 genes, each of which operates within a complex network of genes, doing its small, or large, share of work in building the bee, keeping its internal functions operating, or helping it function and behave in its environment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"The honey bee genome,” Robert Page Jr. explained, “is composed of about 15,000 genes, each of which operates within a complex network of genes, doing its small, or large, share of work in building the bee, keeping its internal functions operating, or helping it function and behave in its environment. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee geneticist Robert Page Jr. (left) with colleagues: bee breeder-geneticist Kim Fondrk of UC Davis, and Martin Beye, former postdoctoral fellow in the Page lab and now a professor at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany.
Honey bee geneticist Robert Page Jr. (left) with colleagues: bee breeder-geneticist Kim Fondrk of UC Davis, and Martin Beye, former postdoctoral fellow in the Page lab and now a professor at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany.

Honey bee geneticist Robert Page Jr. (left) with colleagues: bee breeder-geneticist Kim Fondrk of UC Davis, and Martin Beye, former postdoctoral fellow in the Page lab and now a professor at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany.

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