Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

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Find the Green Darner

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State  Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the green darner. Trying to spot the green darner dragonfly, Anax junius--so named because of its resemblance to a darning needle--is like finding the proverbial needle in a haystack. But there it was, camouflaged in shrubbery on Sept. 23 in the...

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State  Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Green darner dragonfly, Anax junius, in Benicia State Historical Park. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 10, 2018 at 5:00 PM

Buy a Plant and the Pollinators Are Free!

An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you head over to a nursery, and see bees and butterflies and other pollinators foraging on the plants, that's a good sign. Buy the plants. Promise: The pollinators will come. Many gardeners and would-be gardeners are looking forward to the UC...

An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An anise swallowtail, Papilio zelicaon, sets the scene in the Kate Frey Pollinator Garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at 5:11 PM

Targeting the Tsetse Fly

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

He targets the tsetse fly. Tsetse flies, large biting flies that inhabit much of Africa, feed on the blood of humans and other vertebrates and transmit such parasitic diseases as African trypanosomiasis. In humans, this disease is better known as...

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo in his office. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watching It Like a Hawk

A variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum,in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watching it like a hawk... A variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum, that is. We look forward to breezes--even strong gusts--in our little pollinator garden in Vacaville, Calif., because often we'll see dragonflies touch...

A variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum,in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum,in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum,in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Touchdown! The variegated meadow hawk perches on a spent salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Touchdown! The variegated meadow hawk perches on a spent salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Touchdown! The variegated meadow hawk perches on a spent salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, a strong wind drooping its wings, nevetheless kept returning to this perch, a spent salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, a strong wind drooping its wings, nevetheless kept returning to this perch, a spent salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, a strong wind drooping its wings, nevetheless kept returning to this perch, a spent salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye to eye with a variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eye to eye with a variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye to eye with a variegated meadowhawk dragonfly, Sympetrum corruptum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 5, 2018 at 4:44 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

Red Passionflower Vine: Pretty But Poisonous?

A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If want to plant a passionflower vine (Passiflora)--the host plant of Gulf Fritillary butterflies (Agraulis vanillae)--in your garden, go for the species that produce lavender or purple flowers, "not the red ones." That's what we've been told for years....

A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary foraging on a lavender passionflower vine, genus Passiflora. This is the Gulf Frits' host plant, they lay their eggs only on Passiflora. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries avoided this species of red passsionflower vine, Passiflora jamesonii, planted in the Garvey yard. Honey bees, however, did not. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries avoided this species of red passsionflower vine, Passiflora jamesonii, planted in the Garvey yard. Honey bees, however, did not. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries avoided this species of red passsionflower vine, Passiflora jamesonii, planted in the Garvey yard. Honey bees, however, did not. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 4, 2018 at 5:01 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

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