Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Gordon Frankie

What's That Bee? How to Identify and Attract Native Bees to Your Garden

A female ultra green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on Coreopsis tinctora 'Mahogany.' (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a bee buzzing around your garden and wondered: "What's that bee?" Or have you ever seen a bee nectaring in a community garden and wondered "How can I attract THAT bee to my yard?" Just like all floral visitors are not bees, not all...

A female ultra green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on Coreopsis tinctora 'Mahogany.' (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A female ultra green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on Coreopsis tinctora 'Mahogany.' (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female ultra green sweat bee, Agapostemon texanus, on Coreopsis tinctora 'Mahogany.' (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee (Xylocopa varipuncta)
A male Valley carpenter bee (Xylocopa varipuncta) "the teddy bear bee" on germander. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee (Xylocopa varipuncta) "the teddy bear bee" on germander. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, a male Anthophora urbana, on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A digger bee, a male Anthophora urbana, on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A digger bee, a male Anthophora urbana, on lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, September 5, 2017 at 3:51 PM

Kate Frey: How to Attract Pollinators

Award-winning garden designer, author and pollinator specialist Kate Frey addresses a recent crowd at Annie's Annuals and Perennials. Her topic:

It's National Pollinator Week and you might be wondering where your pollinators are.  “I'd love to attract honey bees, bumble bees and other pollinators, but what can I do?" you ask. "Where do I start?" So we asked world-class garden...

Award-winning garden designer, author and pollinator specialist Kate Frey addresses a recent crowd at Annie's Annuals and Perennials. Her topic:
Award-winning garden designer, author and pollinator specialist Kate Frey addresses a recent crowd at Annie's Annuals and Perennials. Her topic: "Gardening for Bees, Beauty and Diversity." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Award-winning garden designer, author and pollinator specialist Kate Frey addresses a recent crowd at Annie's Annuals and Perennials. Her topic: "Gardening for Bees, Beauty and Diversity." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Following her talk at Annie's Annuals and Perennials, Richmond, Kate Frey (center) answers questions and signs copies of her book,
Following her talk at Annie's Annuals and Perennials, Richmond, Kate Frey (center) answers questions and signs copies of her book,"The Bee Friendly Garden" (co-authored with Professor Gretchen LeBuhn of San Francisco State University). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Following her talk at Annie's Annuals and Perennials, Richmond, Kate Frey (center) answers questions and signs copies of her book,"The Bee Friendly Garden" (co-authored with Professor Gretchen LeBuhn of San Francisco State University). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One of the pollinator plants that Kate Frey recommends is the blanket flower, Gaillardia. Here a bumble bee, Bombus californicus, gives its approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One of the pollinator plants that Kate Frey recommends is the blanket flower, Gaillardia. Here a bumble bee, Bombus californicus, gives its approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One of the pollinator plants that Kate Frey recommends is the blanket flower, Gaillardia. Here a bumble bee, Bombus californicus, gives its approval. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Milkweed as one of Kate Frey's favorite pollinator plants. It's not only the host plant of the monarch butterfly, but other insects like it, too, including this leafcutter bee. This species is Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Milkweed as one of Kate Frey's favorite pollinator plants. It's not only the host plant of the monarch butterfly, but other insects like it, too, including this leafcutter bee. This species is Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Milkweed as one of Kate Frey's favorite pollinator plants. It's not only the host plant of the monarch butterfly, but other insects like it, too, including this leafcutter bee. This species is Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee and honey bee share teasel in the pollinator garden of  Kate and Ben Frey, Hopland. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee and honey bee share teasel in the pollinator garden of Kate and Ben Frey, Hopland. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee and honey bee share teasel in the pollinator garden of Kate and Ben Frey, Hopland. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The garden of Kate and Ben Frey, Hopland, is a showstopper.
The garden of Kate and Ben Frey, Hopland, is a showstopper.

The garden of Kate and Ben Frey, Hopland, is a showstopper.

'Mining for Bees' in the Cherry Laurels

A tiny Andrena candida foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you checked to see what's foraging on your early spring blooms? Our cherry laurels (Prunus laurocerasus) are blooming and the Andrena (mining) bees are zooming. These fast-moving bees are solitary ground-nesting bees that are early spring bees,...

A tiny Andrena candida foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A tiny Andrena candida foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A tiny Andrena candida foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Andrena nigrocaerulea foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Andrena nigrocaerulea foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Andrena nigrocaerulea foraging in the cherry laurels in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, April 10, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Landmark Book Addresses California Bees, Blooms

This is a native bumble bee, Bombus californicus, on blanketflower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're looking for a holiday gift for family and friends--or maybe yourself--think bees and blooms. Specifically, California bees and blooms. Even more specifically, undomesticated bees (that is, not honey bees). Did you know that: Of the 4000...

This is a native bumble bee, Bombus californicus, on blanketflower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is a native bumble bee, Bombus californicus, on blanketflower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a native bumble bee, Bombus californicus, on blanketflower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Often mistakenly
Often mistakenly "identified" as a "golden bumble bee," this is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, on flowering milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Often mistakenly "identified" as a "golden bumble bee," this is the male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, on flowering milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, December 6, 2016 at 1:48 PM

Know Your Native Bees: Here's How!

Female sweat bee, Svastra obliqua expurgate, on purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Do you know your native bees? Can you distinguish a sweat bee from a leafcutting bee from a cuckoo bee from a mining bee? No sweat? Or, are you...ahem...sweating the answer?  You can learn more about native bees at a special presentation on...

Female sweat bee, Svastra obliqua expurgate, on purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Female sweat bee, Svastra obliqua expurgate, on purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Female sweat bee, Svastra obliqua expurgate, on purple coneflower, Echinacea purpurea. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., heading for a broadleaf milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., heading for a broadleaf milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A leafcutter bee, Megachile sp., heading for a broadleaf milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male cuckoo bee, Triepeolus concavusm, on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. Female cuckoo bees are cleptoparasites; they lay their eggs inside the nests of native bees, including Svastra. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male cuckoo bee, Triepeolus concavusm, on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. Female cuckoo bees are cleptoparasites; they lay their eggs inside the nests of native bees, including Svastra. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male cuckoo bee, Triepeolus concavusm, on a blanket flower, Gaillardia. Female cuckoo bees are cleptoparasites; they lay their eggs inside the nests of native bees, including Svastra. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Andrena (mining) bee on  meadowfoam, Limnanthes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Andrena (mining) bee on meadowfoam, Limnanthes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Andrena (mining) bee on meadowfoam, Limnanthes. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 22, 2016 at 6:48 PM

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