Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Melissodes agilis

How to Plan a Menu for a Crab Spider

A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dear Crab Spider, Please don't eat the pollinators. You may help yourself to a mosquito, a crane fly, a lygus bug, an aphid, and a katydid, not necessarily in that order. And more than one if you like. In fact, how about an all-you-can-eat buffet of...

A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dines on a sweat bee, a female Halictus tripartitus (as identified by native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missed! A male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, eludes the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Missed! A male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, eludes the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Missed! A male long-horned bee, probably Melissodes agilis, eludes the crab spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider on top of the world, the cone of a petal-less blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider on top of the world, the cone of a petal-less blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider on top of the world, the cone of a petal-less blanket flower (Gaillardia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I can wait all day. And I will. I'm a Wait Watcher. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Hey, I can wait all day. And I will. I'm a Wait Watcher. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hey, I can wait all day. And I will. I'm a Wait Watcher. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 5, 2016 at 5:32 PM

It's Mine; Not Yours!

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this hungry male monarch butterfly sipping nectar from a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia rotundifolia "Torch"). He's sipping, sipping, sipping. He's minding his own business. He's tending to his own needs. It's a good day in the pollinator...

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis (as identified by Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor, UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology) targets a male monarch on a Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm coming at you! The male Melissodes agilis returns to claim his territory. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm coming at you! The male Melissodes agilis returns to claim his territory. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm coming at you! The male Melissodes agilis returns to claim his territory. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, does a barrel roll and attempts again to push the monarch off the Mexican sunflower.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, does a barrel roll and attempts again to push the monarch off the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, does a barrel roll and attempts again to push the monarch off the Mexican sunflower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 28, 2016 at 6:01 PM

About Those Sleepovers...

Male longhorned bees jockeying for position on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We're receiving lots of inquiries about sleepovers ever since we began posting images of male longhorned bees, Melissodes agilis, sleeping on our lavender. Boys' Night Out! While the females sleep in their underground nests, the males cluster on stems....

Male longhorned bees jockeying for position on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Male longhorned bees jockeying for position on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Male longhorned bees jockeying for position on a guara stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not every stem is taken and not all the males cluster six or seven to a stem. These two appear to want space. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Not every stem is taken and not all the males cluster six or seven to a stem. These two appear to want space. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not every stem is taken and not all the males cluster six or seven to a stem. These two appear to want space. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This male Melissodes agilis, is sleeping solo on a guara blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This male Melissodes agilis, is sleeping solo on a guara blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This male Melissodes agilis, is sleeping solo on a guara blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 28, 2014 at 10:01 PM

Stems

A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, awakens on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just one word--stems. Bees forage on the lavender in our bee yard, but sometimes you'll see them on the stems. Male longhorned bees, Melissodes agilis, sleep together on the stems and it's fascinating to watch them stir in the early morning, wiggle...

A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, awakens on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, awakens on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A longhorned bee, Melissodes agilis, awakens on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee warming herself on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee warming herself on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee warming herself on a lavender stem. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 18, 2014 at 10:06 PM

The Monarch and the Melissodes

A male sunflower bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "The Battle Over the Tithonia." A female monarch butterfly--gender identified by butterfly expert Art Shapiro, professor of evolution and ecology at the University of California, Davis and Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of...

A male sunflower bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male sunflower bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male sunflower bee, Melissodes agilis, targets a monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watch your backside! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Watch your backside! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Watch your backside! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Head to head: a monarch and a Melissodes square off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Head to head: a monarch and a Melissodes square off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Head to head: a monarch and a Melissodes square off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 14, 2014 at 10:00 PM

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