Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: assassin bug

Bring on the Tourists!

Assassin bug. Pselliopus spinicollis, feeding on dead Drosophila. (Photo by Sam Beck)

It's a case of a sticky situation benefitting a plant. Or more precisely, dead fruit flies or carrion on a tarweed plant can benefit the plant in more ways that most people would ever think about, say researchers in the UC Davis Department of...

Assassin bug. Pselliopus spinicollis, feeding on dead Drosophila. (Photo by Sam Beck)
Assassin bug. Pselliopus spinicollis, feeding on dead Drosophila. (Photo by Sam Beck)

Assassin bug. Pselliopus spinicollis, feeding on dead Drosophila. (Photo by Sam Beck)

Caterpillar, Heliothodes diminutiva, feeding on tarweed flower. (Photo by Sam Beck)
Caterpillar, Heliothodes diminutiva, feeding on tarweed flower. (Photo by Sam Beck)

Caterpillar, Heliothodes diminutiva, feeding on tarweed flower. (Photo by Sam Beck)

Posted on Monday, January 7, 2013 at 7:44 PM

Gotcha!

Predator and the prey: Assassin bug (left) corners a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It wasn't much of a fight.The assassin bug scored a TKO.Here's what happened: an assassin bug ambushed a spotted cucumber beetle in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven at the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Faciility on Bee Biology Road, UC...

Predator and the prey: Assassin bug (left) corners a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Predator and the prey: Assassin bug (left) corners a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Predator and the prey: Assassin bug (left) corners a pest, a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin bug stabs the spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Assassin bug stabs the spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin bug stabs the spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin bug wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Assassin bug wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin bug wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin bug dining on spotted cucumber beetle.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Assassin bug dining on spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin bug dining on spotted cucumber beetle.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 7, 2011 at 9:12 PM

Assassins in the Tidy Tips

Patch of Tidy Tips

If you see a patch of California native wildflowers known as "Tidy Tips,"  look closely. The yellow daisylike flower with white petals (Layia platyglossa) may yield a surprise visitor. You may see an assassin. An assassin bug. A member of the family...

Patch of Tidy Tips
Patch of Tidy Tips

PATCH OF TIDY TIPS, California native wildflower, planted on the UC Davis campus, behind the Laboratory Sciences Building. If you look closely in the patch, you'll see scores of insects, including honey bees, hover flies, mason bees, ladybugs--and assassin bugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Assassin Bug
Assassin Bug

ASSASSIN BUG, from the genus Zelus and family Reduviidae, waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sip of Nectar
Sip of Nectar

ASSASSIN BUG appears to be sipping nectar from a tidy tip blossom for a quick burst of energy. It preys on small insects, such as aphids, crickets and leafhoppers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 18, 2010 at 6:39 PM
Tags: assassin bug (8), Lynn Kimsey (265), Reduviidae (2), Steve Heydon (41), tidy tips (4), Zelus (1)

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