Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: passionflower vine

A Two-Headed Butterfly?

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There's an old joke circulating among entomologists about excited novices contacting them about finding a "two-headed butterfly." Sounds like National Enquirer stuff, right? Wrong. Just two butterflies mating. If you see lots of Gulf Fritillaries...

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae)on their host plant, Passiflora, doing what nature intended. At the far right is a Gulf Frit caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Two: The Gulf Fritillaries begin to spread their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Two: The Gulf Fritillaries begin to spread their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Two: The Gulf Fritillaries begin to spread their wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Three: The reddish-orange wings of the Gulf Fritillaries are stunning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Three: The reddish-orange wings of the Gulf Fritillaries are stunning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Three: The reddish-orange wings of the Gulf Fritillaries are stunning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Four: The coloring and contrast of the silver-spangled and reddish-orange wings make it one of the showiest butterflies in California. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Four: The coloring and contrast of the silver-spangled and reddish-orange wings make it one of the showiest butterflies in California. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Four: The coloring and contrast of the silver-spangled and reddish-orange wings make it one of the showiest butterflies in California. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Five: These butterflies engaged for about 10 minutes, while the photographer was there. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Five: These butterflies engaged for about 10 minutes, while the photographer was there. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Five: These butterflies engaged for about 10 minutes, while the photographer was there. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Six: After the photographer captured this image, the butterflies separated and flew their separate ways. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photo Six: After the photographer captured this image, the butterflies separated and flew their separate ways. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photo Six: After the photographer captured this image, the butterflies separated and flew their separate ways. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 29, 2018 at 4:39 PM

Ever Seen a Gulf Fritillary Laying an Egg?

Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant, Passiflora. They often lay their eggs on the tendrils. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever seen a Gulf Fritillary butterfly laying an egg? The Gulf Frit (Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant,  Passiflora. When you see its silver-spangled underwings, you...

Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant, Passiflora. They often lay their eggs on the tendrils. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant, Passiflora. They often lay their eggs on the tendrils. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, lays its eggs on its host plant, Passiflora. They often lay their eggs on the tendrils. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Silver-spangled wings of the Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Silver-spangled wings of the Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Silver-spangled wings of the Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 6, 2018 at 5:00 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Natural Resources

Gulf Fritillaries: Passion Makes Perfect

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) soars over a fence to lay its eggs on its host plant, the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No wall can separate a Gulf Fritillary from its host plant, the passionflower vine (Passiflora). The Gulf Frit Agraulis vanillae), an orangish-reddish butterfly of the family Nymphalidae, fluttered over our six-foot fence, heading straight for the...

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) soars over a fence to lay its eggs on its host plant, the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) soars over a fence to lay its eggs on its host plant, the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) soars over a fence to lay its eggs on its host plant, the passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary checks out the host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary checks out the host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary checks out the host plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary maneuvers its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary maneuvers its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary maneuvers its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sideview of a Gulf Fritillary showing its silver-spangled underwings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sideview of a Gulf Fritillary showing its silver-spangled underwings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sideview of a Gulf Fritillary showing its silver-spangled underwings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 12, 2018 at 5:38 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment

California Wild Fires Raging...but Life Cycles Go On...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As those horrendous wild fires continue to rage throughout California, as Cal Fire helicopters roar over, as residents scramble from their homes,  as smoke thickens the air, and as ashes flutter down like feathers, it's difficult to think about...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary caterpillar continues to munch the Passiflora leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary clings to its pupal case. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

In the eerie light of the smoke-choked sky and reddish sun, a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary spreads its wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Pardon Me, Is This My Best Side?

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

She's easy to find. A European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa,  hangs out in our passionflower vine, Passiflora, the host plant of the Gulf Fritillary butterfly. Mantis religiosa is an introduced species, that is, non-native. We introduce...

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The setting sun backlights the European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, perched on a passionflower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, can be many colors, but this one is a light brown. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, can be many colors, but this one is a light brown. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, can be many colors, but this one is a light brown. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, ponders her next move. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, ponders her next move. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European praying mantis, Mantis religiosa, ponders her next move. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 21, 2017 at 4:16 PM

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