Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: queen bee

If I Had a Hammer...

Queen Bee

The number of new housing developments throughout the country continues to shrink as we struggle with the throes of a deep recession. That's with human housing, not in a healthy honey bee hive. The bees are busy building up their colonies, just as they...

Queen Bee
Queen Bee

QUEEN BEE (with the dot) is surrounded by worker bees (sterile females). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Line-Up
Line-Up

WORKER BEES are lined up in perfect formation as they tend to the queen bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Inspecting a Cell
Inspecting a Cell

QUEEN BEE pokes her head in a cell before laying an egg in it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, March 19, 2010 at 6:50 PM

Life and Death in the Hive

Queen Bee

Life and death in the bee observation hive... If you ever have the opportunity to check out a bee observation hive--a glassed-in hive showing the colony at work--you can easily spot the three castes: the queen bee, worker bees and drones. If you look...

Queen Bee
Queen Bee

QUEEN BEE, marked with the dot, is circled by her royal attendants in a retinue. This was taken through the glass of an observation hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Undertaker Bee
Undertaker Bee

IN THIS BEE OBSERVATION HIVE photo, an undertaker bee carries out her dead sister. The glassed-in observation hive offers a view of life and death in the hive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 at 6:45 PM

Hail to the Queen

Classic Retinue

Oh, to be a queen bee... Her Royal Highness (HRH) is quite pampered. She's always surrounded by her royal attendants, called the retinue. They tend to her every need. They feed and groom her. They keep her warm or cool, depending on the temperature...

Classic Retinue
Classic Retinue

CLASSIC RETINUE--A queen bee is surrounded by her royal attendants--the retinue. (Photo courtesy of Susan Cobey, Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility, UC Davis)

Queen Bee
Queen Bee

RETINUE--It's easy to tell which bees are the queen's retinue or royal attendants. They're NOT the ones--bottoms up--cleaning the cells. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 31, 2009 at 7:32 PM
Tags: classic retinue (1), queen bee (10), retinue (2)

Not All Sweetness

Queen Cell

The honey bee hive is not all sweetness. The first virgin queen bee to emerge from her cell (each queen cell resembles a peanut shell) will rid the colony of her competition. After emerging, the queen makes a mark on the other queen cells. That's an...

Queen Cell
Queen Cell

HOLE in the queen cell indicates that the worker bees went in and destroyed the yet-to-be-born queen. The first queen to emerge makes a mark on the shell to indicate that the worker bees are to destroy it. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 30, 2009 at 6:32 PM

The Queen Bee

The queen bee and her court

If you were a queen bee, you'd be laying about 1500 to 2000 eggs today. It's your busy season. "She's an egg-laying machine," said bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility at UC Davis....

The queen bee and her court
The queen bee and her court

The queen bee (the largest bee, center) is surrounded by her court, the worker bees, who take care of her every need. They feed her, groom her and protect her "and then they have the additional tasks of rearing and feeding her young," said bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey of the UC Davis Department of Entomology. (Photo courtesy of Susan Cobey, UC Davis Department of Entomology)

A Marked Queen Bee
A Marked Queen Bee

Where's the queen bee? She's easy to spot. She's the one with the dot. These bees are part of a colony being reared by Kim Fondrk of UC Davis. See http://entomology.ucdavis.edu/news/beestock.html. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2008 at 11:29 AM
Tags: drones (8), Kim Fondrk (10), queen bee (10), Susan Cobey (83), worker bees (6)

First storyPrevious 5 stories

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu