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Posts Tagged: salvia

UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale: Think Pollinators!

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think bees. Think butterflies. Think plants that will attract them. The UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden is hosting its first in a series of fall plant sales on Saturday, Oct. 7 at the Arboretum Teaching Nursery on Garrod Drive, UC Davis...

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, sips nectars from a butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, sips nectars from a butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, sips nectars from a butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing honey bee heads for rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This is one of the plants available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 7. The plant yields red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-packing honey bee heads for rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This is one of the plants available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 7. The plant yields red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing honey bee heads for rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This is one of the plants available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 7. The plant yields red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 5, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22: Yes, There's Life After Lawn

Monarch butterfly nectaring on Buddleia 'Purple Haze.' This will be one of the plants offered at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Is there life after lawn? Yes. If you're looking for plants to attract pollinators, including bees and butterflies, then the UC Davis Arboretum's Plant Sale on Saturday, Oct. 22 is the place to "bee." A public fall clearance sale will be held from 9...

Monarch butterfly nectaring on Buddleia 'Purple Haze.' This will be one of the plants offered at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarch butterfly nectaring on Buddleia 'Purple Haze.' This will be one of the plants offered at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarch butterfly nectaring on Buddleia 'Purple Haze.' This will be one of the plants offered at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa) will be available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. The milkweed plant is the host plant of monarchs; it's the only food that monarch caterpillars eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa) will be available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. The milkweed plant is the host plant of monarchs; it's the only food that monarch caterpillars eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa) will be available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 22. The milkweed plant is the host plant of monarchs; it's the only food that monarch caterpillars eat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 21, 2016 at 2:52 PM

The Nectar Robbers

Mountain carpenter bee, Xylocopa tabaniformis orpifex, engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you have a patch of salvia (sage) growing in your yard, watch for the nectar robbers. Carpenter bees are among the insects that engage in nectar robbing. They drill a hole in the corolla of the flower, circumventing the usual plant-pollinator...

Mountain carpenter bee, Xylocopa tabaniformis orpifex, engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mountain carpenter bee, Xylocopa tabaniformis orpifex, engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mountain carpenter bee, Xylocopa tabaniformis orpifex, engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of nectar robbing by mountain carpenter bee on salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Side view of nectar robbing by mountain carpenter bee on salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Side view of nectar robbing by mountain carpenter bee on salvia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Honey bee looks for the hole drilled by a carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee looks for the hole drilled by a carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee looks for the hole drilled by a carpenter bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee engaging in nectar robbing. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 28, 2014 at 9:57 PM

Oh, the Life of a Praying Mantis...

Praying mantis hangs upside down on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, the life of a praying mantis... You can hang upside down like an acrobat, shading yourself from the sun while waiting for prey and avoiding predators. You can crawl beneath dense leaves, the better to ambush, snatch and eat an unsuspecting bee....

Praying mantis hangs upside down on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis hangs upside down on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis hangs upside down on a zinnia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis eating a bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Praying mantis eating a bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Praying mantis eating a bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mating pair of praying mantids. The green one (left) is the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mating pair of praying mantids. The green one (left) is the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mating pair of praying mantids. The green one (left) is the male. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, September 27, 2012 at 10:58 PM

Salivating the Salvia

Honey Bee on Salvia

Hmm, ever wonder why honey bees love salvia? Are they going for that nectar or are they going for something else? Salvia divinorum, which like all the salvias, is a member of the mint family, is gaining notoriety for its hallucinogenic effects. Videos...

Honey Bee on Salvia
Honey Bee on Salvia

HONEY BEE nectaring salvia. This one is Salvia leucantha or "Mexican sage." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, January 3, 2011 at 9:25 PM
Tags: honey bees (341), salvia (11)

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