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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: syrphid fly

Sharing the Nectar--But Not All at the Same Time

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Everybody eats in the pollinator garden. Maybe not at the same time, but they all eat. We noticed a syrphid fly, aka flower fly/hover fly, heading toward a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) in our pollinator garden. Alas for the fly, it was occupied....

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly (bottom right) heads toward a Mexican sunflower occupied by a honey bee. The fly, aka hover fly and flower fly, wants some nectar, too.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can we share? As the honey bee keeps nectaring, the syrphid comes in for a taste. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The honey bee wins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! The syprhid fly takes over. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the
All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the "H" on the abdomen of the fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All mine! A drone fly claims it. The drone fly is often mistaken for a bee. Note the "H" on the abdomen of the fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 13, 2016 at 4:36 PM
Tags: drone fly (13), Halloween (8), honey bee (195), insects (50), Mexican sunflower (42), nectar (6), syrphid fly (17), Tithonia (51)

Why Flies Are Pollinators, Too!

A  bee fly, genus Villa, collecting pollen on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Will all the pollinators please stand up! Or do a fly-by like the Blue Angels or a crawl-by like babies competing in a diaper derby. Bees--there are more than 4000 of them in North America--are the main pollinators, but don't overlook butterflies,...

A  bee fly, genus Villa, collecting pollen on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bee fly, genus Villa, collecting pollen on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bee fly, genus Villa, collecting pollen on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee (left) and a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly, sharing a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee (left) and a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly, sharing a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee (left) and a syrphid fly, aka hover fly or flower fly, sharing a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 at 6:57 PM
Tags: bee fly (3), Bombyliidae (2), flower fly (12), honey bees (345), hover fly (19), Pollination Nation (3), pollinators (30), syrphid fly (17), syrphids (4), Villa (1)

Quit Mimicking Me!

This wasp mimic is actually a fly, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Last weekend a little critter made its first-ever appearance in our family bee garden. It was neither a grand entrance nor a grand insect.    "A fly!" I thought, as I looked at its knoblike bristle or arista on the end of each antenna....

This wasp mimic is actually a fly, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This wasp mimic is actually a fly, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This wasp mimic is actually a fly, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Davis photographer Allan Jones captured this fantastic  image of the wasp mimic, Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Davis photographer Allan Jones captured this fantastic image of the wasp mimic, Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Davis photographer Allan Jones captured this fantastic image of the wasp mimic, Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a Western yellowjacket, Vespula pensylvanic, which looks a lot like the wasp mimic, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is a Western yellowjacket, Vespula pensylvanic, which looks a lot like the wasp mimic, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a Western yellowjacket, Vespula pensylvanic, which looks a lot like the wasp mimic, genus Ceriana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a European paper wasp, Polistes dominula. A syrphid fly mimics this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is a European paper wasp, Polistes dominula. A syrphid fly mimics this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a European paper wasp, Polistes dominula. A syrphid fly mimics this. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 8, 2014 at 6:07 PM

The Power of Red

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, sipping nectar from a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

There's a heartfelt reason why Friday, Feb. 7 is "UC Davis Wears Red Day."    It's about raising awareness for heart disease, the No. 1 killer of both men and women. It's a battle we need to fight with an arsenal of weapons. Spearheading the...

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, sipping nectar from a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, sipping nectar from a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A syrphid fly, aka flower fly or hover fly, sipping nectar from a tower of jewels. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lady beetle, aka lady bug, is a
A lady beetle, aka lady bug, is a "lady in red." (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

A lady beetle, aka lady bug, is a "lady in red." (Photo by Kathy Keatley)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, rests on a stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, rests on a stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata, rests on a stake. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flesh fly, family Sarcophagidae, grooming itself.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A flesh fly, family Sarcophagidae, grooming itself.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A flesh fly, family Sarcophagidae, grooming itself. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee with red pollen from a nearby rock puslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bee with red pollen from a nearby rock puslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bee with red pollen from a nearby rock puslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, February 6, 2014 at 10:05 PM

A Bug-Eat-Bug World

Syrphid fly (right) circles a blanket flower, unaware of the jumping spider.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a bug-eat-bug world out there. Today we watched a syrphid fly, aka "hover fly" and "flower fly," circling a blanket flower (Gaillardia) and then touching down to sip a little nectar. Syrphids are called "hover flies" for good reason. They "hover"...

Syrphid fly (right) circles a blanket flower, unaware of the jumping spider.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Syrphid fly (right) circles a blanket flower, unaware of the jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid fly (right) circles a blanket flower, unaware of the jumping spider. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid fly sipping nectar close to the predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Syrphid fly sipping nectar close to the predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Syrphid fly sipping nectar close to the predator. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

End result--the jumping spider feasting on the syrphid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
End result--the jumping spider feasting on the syrphid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

End result--the jumping spider feasting on the syrphid fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, October 17, 2012 at 8:37 PM

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