Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Aedes aegypti

The Work of William Hazeltine II Lives On

Brothers Craig and Lee Hazeltine recently honored Bill Hazeltine Research Award recipients Olivia Winokur and Maribel

The late medical entomologist William Emery Hazeltine II (1926-1994) worked tirelessly in mosquito research and public health. Thanks to the generosity of his family, his work is continuing through memorial research grants to outstanding graduate...

Brothers Craig and Lee Hazeltine recently honored Bill Hazeltine Research Award recipients Olivia Winokur and Maribel
Brothers Craig and Lee Hazeltine recently honored Bill Hazeltine Research Award recipients Olivia Winokur and Maribel "Mimi" Portilla at a luncheon. UC Davis medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo, assistant professor, Department of Entomology and Nematology, joined them. From left are Geoffrey Attardo, Craig Hazeltine, Lee Hazeltine and Maribel Portilla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brothers Craig and Lee Hazeltine recently honored Bill Hazeltine Research Award recipients Olivia Winokur and Maribel "Mimi" Portilla at a luncheon. UC Davis medical entomologist Geoffrey Attardo, assistant professor, Department of Entomology and Nematology, joined them. From left are Geoffrey Attardo, Craig Hazeltine, Lee Hazeltine and Maribel Portilla. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The World of Olivia Winokur

UC Davis doctoral student and mosquito researcher Olivia Winokur checks on mosquitoes in the walk-in chamber in the insectary. The chamber is set to 26 Celsius and 80 percent humidity to mimic tropical conditions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever wondered what it's like to be a UC Davis doctoral student researching mosquitoes? Meet Olivia Winokur, an enthusiastic, dedicated and multi-talented medical entomologist whose childhood curiosity about a yellow fever vaccination sparked...

UC Davis doctoral student and mosquito researcher Olivia Winokur checks on mosquitoes in the walk-in chamber in the insectary. The chamber is set to 26 Celsius and 80 percent humidity to mimic tropical conditions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student and mosquito researcher Olivia Winokur checks on mosquitoes in the walk-in chamber in the insectary. The chamber is set to 26 Celsius and 80 percent humidity to mimic tropical conditions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student and mosquito researcher Olivia Winokur checks on mosquitoes in the walk-in chamber in the insectary. The chamber is set to 26 Celsius and 80 percent humidity to mimic tropical conditions. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Olivia Winokur holds a tray of Culex tarsalis larvae in the insectoary. The Chris Barker lab now has nine colonies of mosquitoes in the insectary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student Olivia Winokur holds a tray of Culex tarsalis larvae in the insectoary. The Chris Barker lab now has nine colonies of mosquitoes in the insectary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Olivia Winokur holds a tray of Culex tarsalis larvae in the insectoary. The Chris Barker lab now has nine colonies of mosquitoes in the insectary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olivia Winokur answers questions about her poster at the UC Davis Research Symposium on the Designated Emphasis in the Biology of Vector-Borne Diseases (DEBVPD). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Olivia Winokur answers questions about her poster at the UC Davis Research Symposium on the Designated Emphasis in the Biology of Vector-Borne Diseases (DEBVPD). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Olivia Winokur answers questions about her poster at the UC Davis Research Symposium on the Designated Emphasis in the Biology of Vector-Borne Diseases (DEBVPD). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2018 at 4:33 PM

Battling Dengue at a Field Station in Iquitos, Peru

This is Iquitos, Peru, known as the

UC Davis epidemiologist Amy Morrison knows Iquitos, Peru, like the back of her hand. Travelers know Iquitos as the "capital of the Peruvian Amazon" but scientists know it as a hot spot for dengue, a mosquito-borne viral disease with raging outbreaks in...

This is Iquitos, Peru, known as the
This is Iquitos, Peru, known as the "capital of the Peruvian Amazon." Scientists know it as a hot spot for dengue. (Photo courtesy of the Thomas Scott lab)

This is Iquitos, Peru, known as the "capital of the Peruvian Amazon." Scientists know it as a hot spot for dengue. (Photo courtesy of the Thomas Scott lab)

UC Davis epidemiologist Amy Morrison discusses dengue with Iquitos residents.
UC Davis epidemiologist Amy Morrison discusses dengue with Iquitos residents.

UC Davis epidemiologist Amy Morrison discusses dengue with Iquitos residents.

Posted on Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 3:24 PM

UC Davis Researcher: What Repellents and Doses Are Best to Prevent Zika Virus

Working on zika-virus research are UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (foreground) and colleagues and co-authors Rosangela Barbosa (center) and graduate student Gabriel Faierstein of FIOCRUZ-PE, Recife, Brazil.

If you're traveling to—or living in--a Zika virus-infested area, it's far better to use DEET rather than Picaridin and to use higher, rather than lower, doses of DEET because lower doses do not work well with older mosquitoes, newly published...

Working on zika-virus research are UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (foreground) and colleagues and co-authors Rosangela Barbosa (center) and graduate student Gabriel Faierstein of FIOCRUZ-PE, Recife, Brazil.
Working on zika-virus research are UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (foreground) and colleagues and co-authors Rosangela Barbosa (center) and graduate student Gabriel Faierstein of FIOCRUZ-PE, Recife, Brazil.

Working on zika-virus research are UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal (foreground) and colleagues and co-authors Rosangela Barbosa (center) and graduate student Gabriel Faierstein of FIOCRUZ-PE, Recife, Brazil.

The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, can also transmit the Zika virus, but the primary mosquito is the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, can also transmit the Zika virus, but the primary mosquito is the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, can also transmit the Zika virus, but the primary mosquito is the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2017 at 2:00 AM

Zeroing in on the Zika Virus at ICE 2016

Nobel Laureate Peter Agre (center), a keynote speaker at ICE 2016, is flanked by the ICE 2016 co-chairs,  Walter Leal (left) of UC Davis, and Alvin Simmons of the USDA/ARS, based in Charleston, S.C.

The yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, probably isn't the only mosquito that transmits the Zika virus. That's what UC Davis chemical ecologist Walter Leal, co-chair of the International Congress of Entomology (ICE 2016) recently held in Orlando,...

Nobel Laureate Peter Agre (center), a keynote speaker at ICE 2016, is flanked by the ICE 2016 co-chairs,  Walter Leal (left) of UC Davis, and Alvin Simmons of the USDA/ARS, based in Charleston, S.C.
Nobel Laureate Peter Agre (center), a keynote speaker at ICE 2016, is flanked by the ICE 2016 co-chairs, Walter Leal (left) of UC Davis, and Alvin Simmons of the USDA/ARS, based in Charleston, S.C.

Nobel Laureate Peter Agre (center), a keynote speaker at ICE 2016, is flanked by the ICE 2016 co-chairs, Walter Leal (left) of UC Davis, and Alvin Simmons of the USDA/ARS, based in Charleston, S.C.

ICE 2016 in action: From left are May Berenbaum, president of the Entomological Society of America; and ICE 2016 co-chairs Walter Leal (center) and Alvin Simmons.
ICE 2016 in action: From left are May Berenbaum, president of the Entomological Society of America; and ICE 2016 co-chairs Walter Leal (center) and Alvin Simmons.

ICE 2016 in action: From left are May Berenbaum, president of the Entomological Society of America; and ICE 2016 co-chairs Walter Leal (center) and Alvin Simmons.

Posted on Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 3:55 PM

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu