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Posts Tagged: Art Shapiro

The Spider and the Skipper

A banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata)--as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro--waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is a a story about a spider and a skipper. Technically, a banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata) and a fiery skipper butterfly (Hylephila phyleus, family Hesperiida). The garden spider lies in wait, its head down, clinging to its real...

A banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata)--as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro--waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata)--as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro--waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata)--as identified by UC Davis distinguished professor Art Shapiro--waits for prey. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata) wraps its meal, a male fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata) wraps its meal, a male fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The banded garden spider (Argiope trifasciata) wraps its meal, a male fiery skipper (Hylephila phyleus). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While the garden spider wraps its prey, two fiery skippers (Hylephila phyleus) prepare to mate on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
While the garden spider wraps its prey, two fiery skippers (Hylephila phyleus) prepare to mate on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

While the garden spider wraps its prey, two fiery skippers (Hylephila phyleus) prepare to mate on a Tithonia. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 27, 2015 at 5:55 PM

Cabbage White Butterfly Not So Bad?

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's the butterfly we're supposed to hate. That would be the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. Its larvae or cabbageworms are pests of our cole crops, including cabbage, kale and mustard. Pests? You bet. According to the UC Statewide...

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, nectaring on catmint. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, are considered pests of cole crops, but we should be thanking them for giving us the pungent taste of wasabi and mustard, scientists say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, are considered pests of cole crops, but we should be thanking them for giving us the pungent taste of wasabi and mustard, scientists say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The larvae of the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, are considered pests of cole crops, but we should be thanking them for giving us the pungent taste of wasabi and mustard, scientists say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 11, 2015 at 9:16 PM

Butterfly Ballet

A Western tiger swallowtail nectarine on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you plant it, they will come. Western tiger swallowtails (Papilio rutulus) can't get enough of our butterfly bush. For the first time ever, we saw two of them and managed to get both in the same image. Courtship? Curiosity? Chance...

A Western tiger swallowtail nectarine on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail nectarine on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail nectarine on a butterfly bush. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mirror image! A Western tiger swallowtail spots a member of its species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Mirror image! A Western tiger swallowtail spots a member of its species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mirror image! A Western tiger swallowtail spots a member of its species. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello there! A Western tiger swallowtail checks out another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Well, hello there! A Western tiger swallowtail checks out another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Well, hello there! A Western tiger swallowtail checks out another one. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up, up and away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's up, up and away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up, up and away. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, August 3, 2015 at 8:34 PM

One Cool Little Moth: Schinia sueta!

This moth, Schinia sueta, feeds on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa, in a meadow at Hastings Preserve, Carmel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever heard of Schinia sueta? It's a moth. We spotted this little moth, from the Noctuidae family, in a meadow at the Hastings Preserve in Carmel in early May during the BugShot Macro Photography Course, taught by Alex Wild, John Abbott and Thomas...

This moth, Schinia sueta, feeds on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa, in a meadow at Hastings Preserve, Carmel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This moth, Schinia sueta, feeds on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa, in a meadow at Hastings Preserve, Carmel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This moth, Schinia sueta, feeds on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa, in a meadow at Hastings Preserve, Carmel. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Schinia sueta is a day-flying moth. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Schinia sueta is a day-flying moth. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Schinia sueta is a day-flying moth. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off to the next flower! Schinia sueta foraging on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Off to the next flower! Schinia sueta foraging on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Off to the next flower! Schinia sueta foraging on hairy vetch, Vicia villosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, June 9, 2015 at 5:44 PM

Luck Be a Lady! (A Painted Lady)

A Painted Lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The "Painted Ladies" are back in the Davis area. These are not the two-legged type, but the winged type--Vanessa cardui. They're migrating and driving UC Davis entomology and ecology students nuts. It's finals week and they'd love to be outdoors...

A Painted Lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Painted Lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Painted Lady, Vanessa cardui, nectaring on lantana. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 18, 2015 at 8:23 PM

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