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Posts Tagged: Art Shapiro

No Winner Yet in Beer-for-a-Butterfly Contest!

If you collect the first-of-the-year cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in the three-county area of Sacramento, Yolo and Solano, you could win the

If you've been looking for that elusive first-of-the-year cabbage white butterfly in the three-county area of Sacramento, Yolo and Solano, you're in luck. Art Shapiro hasn't found it yet, and neither has anyone else. So you can keep looking. If you...

If you collect the first-of-the-year cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in the three-county area of Sacramento, Yolo and Solano, you could win the
If you collect the first-of-the-year cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in the three-county area of Sacramento, Yolo and Solano, you could win the "Beer for a Butterfly" contest. Here a cabbage white heads for lantana.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you collect the first-of-the-year cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae, in the three-county area of Sacramento, Yolo and Solano, you could win the "Beer for a Butterfly" contest. Here a cabbage white heads for lantana.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Suds for a Bug? How You Can Exchange a Butterfly for a Pitcher of Beer!

Two cabbage white butterflies, Pieris rapae, flutter over catmint in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, it's true. You can exchange suds for a bug. That would be a cabbage white butterfly for a pitcher of beer or its equivalent. And it's all in the interest of science. Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at the...

Two cabbage white butterflies, Pieris rapae, flutter over catmint in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two cabbage white butterflies, Pieris rapae, flutter over catmint in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two cabbage white butterflies, Pieris rapae, flutter over catmint in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Insect Apocalypse: Where Have All the Insects Gone?

Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at UC Davis, walks along one of his study areas, Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Where have all the flowers gone? Long time passing Where have all the flowers gone? Long time ago Where have all the flowers gone? Girls have picked them every one When will they ever learn? When will they ever learn?"--Pete Seeger The late folksinger...

Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at UC Davis, walks along one of his study areas, Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at UC Davis, walks along one of his study areas, Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at UC Davis, walks along one of his study areas, Gates Canyon Road, Vacaville. This image was taken Jan. 25, 2014. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, November 28, 2018 at 4:25 PM

Monarchs: You Can't Save Them All

A monarch chrysalis that didn't make it. This image was taken Sept. 15. Said Art Shapiro of UC Davis:

Monarchs: you can't save them all. It was a dismal year in Vacaville (and other parts of California) for monarch-rearing. Of the 10 caterpillars we collected from milkweed in our pollinator garden in early September and tried to rear, only eight made...

A monarch chrysalis that didn't make it. This image was taken Sept. 15. Said Art Shapiro of UC Davis:
A monarch chrysalis that didn't make it. This image was taken Sept. 15. Said Art Shapiro of UC Davis: "The intersegmental membranes are showing. Whatever caused that, it opens the door to severe water loss, so the pupa will probably die." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A monarch chrysalis that didn't make it. This image was taken Sept. 15. Said Art Shapiro of UC Davis: "The intersegmental membranes are showing. Whatever caused that, it opens the door to severe water loss, so the pupa will probably die." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is what the non-viable monarch chrysalis looked like on Oct. 10. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is what the non-viable monarch chrysalis looked like on Oct. 10. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is what the non-viable monarch chrysalis looked like on Oct. 10. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Lynn Epstein, UC Davis emeritus professor of plant pathology, captured this image of the monarch chrysalis on Nov. 2 with a Leica DVM6 microscope.
Lynn Epstein, UC Davis emeritus professor of plant pathology, captured this image of the monarch chrysalis on Nov. 2 with a Leica DVM6 microscope.

Lynn Epstein, UC Davis emeritus professor of plant pathology, captured this image of the monarch chrysalis on Nov. 2 with a Leica DVM6 microscope.

Monarchs overwintering at Natural Bridges State Park on Nov. 14, 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Monarchs overwintering at Natural Bridges State Park on Nov. 14, 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Monarchs overwintering at Natural Bridges State Park on Nov. 14, 2016. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Autumn's Hues: The Gulf Fritillary and Mexican Sunflower

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"The butterfly counts not months but moments, and has time enough."--Rabindranath Tagore  When we think of orange and autumn, we think of the marriage of the Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae), and the Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). The...

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary will soon be able to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Gulf Fritillary will soon be able to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Gulf Fritillary will soon be able to take flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The silver-spangled Gulf Fritillary, a showy orange butterfly, looks like two different species. When it spreads its wings, it's orange. The underwings: silver. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The silver-spangled Gulf Fritillary, a showy orange butterfly, looks like two different species. When it spreads its wings, it's orange. The underwings: silver. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The silver-spangled Gulf Fritillary, a showy orange butterfly, looks like two different species. When it spreads its wings, it's orange. The underwings: silver. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not two butterflies; this is one, the Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Not two butterflies; this is one, the Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Not two butterflies; this is one, the Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The showy Gulf Fritillary on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The showy Gulf Fritillary on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The showy Gulf Fritillary on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, November 12, 2018 at 10:02 AM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

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