Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Bombus melanopygus.

Word of the Day: Nototribic

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus with a thick load of resin on her thorax. She had just visited a nototribic flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The black-tailed bumble bee wasn't flying very well. You wouldn't, either, if you were trying to fly with a backpack on your back. Except this wasn't a backpack but sticky pollen. The bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, was foraging in our Spanish...

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus with a thick load of resin on her thorax. She had just visited a nototribic flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus with a thick load of resin on her thorax. She had just visited a nototribic flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-tailed bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus with a thick load of resin on her thorax. She had just visited a nototribic flower. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the pollen hump on the back of the black-tailed bumble bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatle Garvey)
Dorsal view of the pollen hump on the back of the black-tailed bumble bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatle Garvey)

Dorsal view of the pollen hump on the back of the black-tailed bumble bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatle Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at 6:25 PM
Focus Area Tags: Natural Resources

The Humble Bumble Bee

Queen Bumble Bee

A sure sign of approaching spring... As the cold weather subsides, out come the overwintering queen bumble bees. They're gathering nectar and pollen, building their nests and laying eggs. Lynn Kimsey, professor and chair of the UC Davis Department...

Queen Bumble Bee
Queen Bumble Bee

QUEEN BUMBLE BEE--The queen bumble bees are out again, after overwintering. Entomologist Lynn Kimsey found this young queen in Briggs Hall on the UC Davis campus yesterday. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peeking Out
Peeking Out

BUMBLE BEES occasionally build their nests in birdhouses. Here a Bombus melanopygus in a birdhouse last year on the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility grounds heads out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, February 27, 2009 at 5:58 PM
 
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