Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Davis

European Carder Bees Do Like Snapdragons!

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a show! Last weekend we spotted female European wool carder bees (so named because they collect or card plant hairs for their nests) buzzing in and out of our snapdragons. The bees, about the size of honey bees, are mostly black and yellow. The...

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male European wool carder bee patrolling snapdragons in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The European wool carder bee is about the size of a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the European wool carder bee as it rests on a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All that patrolling makes a fellow tired. A male European wool carder bee rests on a leaf. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bottoms up! A female wool carder bee foraging in a snapdragon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, June 6, 2019 at 5:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

A Sign of the Times: Why This Black Walnut Tree Is Dying

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you've ever walked into the courtyard on the 100 block of E Street in downtown Davis, Calif., you've probably noticed the massive black walnut tree near Sophia's Thai Bar and Kitchen. It's about 150 years old, 50 feet in height, and measures about...

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forest entomologists Steve Seybold (right) and Jackson Audley stand by a 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street. It is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Walnut twig beetles tunnel into branches and trunks of walnut (Juglans) where they create galleries for mating and reproduction. In association with a canker producing fungus, Tthey cause a disease known as thousand cankers disease. This tree is in downtown Davis, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This massive, 150-year-old black walnut tree on the 100 block of E Street, Davis, is dying of thousand cankers disease. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hear That Buzz? It's World Bee Day!

Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board.  Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Hear that buzz? Today is World Bee Day! We celebrate honey bees every day, but they are especially celebrated on May 20, World Bee Day. It's an annual day to raise awareness about the importance of bees and beekeeping. It's a day to acknowledge the...

Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board.  Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board. Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Adelaide Grandia smiles through a pollinator cut-out board. Her grandfather is teaching her beekeeping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Adelaide Grandia and her grandfather, Dwight Grandia of Gulf Shores, Ala., confer on a bee vacuum device. He is teaching her how to keep bees and recently set up a hive for her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Adelaide Grandia and her grandfather, Dwight Grandia of Gulf Shores, Ala., confer on a bee vacuum device. He is teaching her how to keep bees and recently set up a hive for her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Adelaide Grandia and her grandfather, Dwight Grandia of Gulf Shores, Ala., confer on a bee vacuum device. He is teaching her how to keep bees and recently set up a hive for her. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier, who works in the chancellor and provost offices as manager of Budget and Financial Analyis, guides her twin daughters Casey and Gabrielle, 8, in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. The garden, located on Bee Biology Road, was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ariel Cormier, who works in the chancellor and provost offices as manager of Budget and Financial Analyis, guides her twin daughters Casey and Gabrielle, 8, in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. The garden, located on Bee Biology Road, was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier, who works in the chancellor and provost offices as manager of Budget and Financial Analyis, guides her twin daughters Casey and Gabrielle, 8, in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. The garden, located on Bee Biology Road, was installed in the fall of 2009. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier shows her daughter, Gabrielle, how to use the bee vacuum device, a catch-and-release activity. At right is daughter Casey. The 8-year-old girls are twins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ariel Cormier shows her daughter, Gabrielle, how to use the bee vacuum device, a catch-and-release activity. At right is daughter Casey. The 8-year-old girls are twins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier shows her daughter, Gabrielle, how to use the bee vacuum device, a catch-and-release activity. At right is daughter Casey. The 8-year-old girls are twins. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier with eight-year-old twin daughters Casey (left) and Gabrielle at the Miss Bee Haven sculpture. It's a six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture of a worker bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ariel Cormier with eight-year-old twin daughters Casey (left) and Gabrielle at the Miss Bee Haven sculpture. It's a six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture of a worker bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ariel Cormier with eight-year-old twin daughters Casey (left) and Gabrielle at the Miss Bee Haven sculpture. It's a six-foot-long mosaic and ceramic sculpture of a worker bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee David Hernandez (left) with sons Aayden, 10 (center) and Evan, 8, pose behind the pollinator cut-out board. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis employee David Hernandez (left) with sons Aayden, 10 (center) and Evan, 8, pose behind the pollinator cut-out board. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee David Hernandez (left) with sons Aayden, 10 (center) and Evan, 8, pose behind the pollinator cut-out board. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee Chunying Xu with her son, Andy, look for bees in the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis employee Chunying Xu with her son, Andy, look for bees in the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee Chunying Xu with her son, Andy, look for bees in the bee garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What Happens When Quizzical Kids Meet a Smiling Queen Bee

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, stands in front of the booth at the California Honey Fstival while a youngster gives her a quizzical look. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you're a little kid and there's a huge bee towering over you, what do you do? You do what comes naturally. Kids reacted differently toward the adults who donned the California Master Beekeeper Program's queen bee costume at the third annual...

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, stands in front of the booth at the California Honey Fstival while a youngster gives her a quizzical look. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, stands in front of the booth at the California Honey Fstival while a youngster gives her a quizzical look. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, stands in front of the booth at the California Honey Fstival while a youngster gives her a quizzical look. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This little boy eagerly thrusts out his hand as he meets Ms. Queen Bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This little boy eagerly thrusts out his hand as he meets Ms. Queen Bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This little boy eagerly thrusts out his hand as he meets Ms. Queen Bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

See my little buddy, Porky? This a meeting between a boy, his pig, and a towering bee. (Photo Kathy Keatley Garvey)
See my little buddy, Porky? This a meeting between a boy, his pig, and a towering bee. (Photo Kathy Keatley Garvey)

See my little buddy, Porky? This a meeting between a boy, his pig, and a towering bee. (Photo Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can you remove your head? This little boy was delighted when Ms. Queen Bee did. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Can you remove your head? This little boy was delighted when Ms. Queen Bee did. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can you remove your head? This little boy was delighted when Ms. Queen Bee did. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Yes, Locusts Browse Computer Dating Sites

This is the illustration that Karissa Merritt, UC Davis entomology major and artist, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar for the month of January. The calendar is available to the public for $12.

Do locusts browse computer dating sites, trying to find a match made in heaven? They do. Just check out the Bohart Museum of Entomology's newly published calendar. "Mr. January" is a locust sitting quite comfortably in a chair--a swivel chair at...

This is the illustration that Karissa Merritt, UC Davis entomology major and artist, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar for the month of January. The calendar is available to the public for $12.
This is the illustration that Karissa Merritt, UC Davis entomology major and artist, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar for the month of January. The calendar is available to the public for $12.

This is the illustration that Karissa Merritt, UC Davis entomology major and artist, created for the Bohart Museum of Entomology calendar for the month of January. The calendar is available to the public for $12.

This banded-winged grasshopper--family Acrididae, subfamily Oedipodinae--apparently has little interest in checking out dating sites on the computer. Kathy Keatley Garvey captured this image on the UC Davis campus in September 2011; identification by Bohart senior museum scientist Steve Heydon.
This banded-winged grasshopper--family Acrididae, subfamily Oedipodinae--apparently has little interest in checking out dating sites on the computer. Kathy Keatley Garvey captured this image on the UC Davis campus in September 2011; identification by Bohart senior museum scientist Steve Heydon.

This banded-winged grasshopper--family Acrididae, subfamily Oedipodinae--apparently has little interest in checking out dating sites on the computer. Kathy Keatley Garvey captured this image on the UC Davis campus in September 2011; identification by Bohart senior museum scientist Steve Heydon.

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu