Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Gulf Fritillaries

Butterfly Summit Features UC Davis Expert Art Shapiro

A male monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

How's the butterfly population faring in north-central California? What do you plant to attract and sustain them? You can find out at the second annual Butterfly Summit, a free event hosted by Annie's Annuals and Perennials in Richmond.  The event...

Posted on Thursday, May 24, 2018 at 2:03 PM

California Wild Fires Raging...but Life Cycles Go On...

A Gulf Fritillary egg on the tendrils of the passionflower vine (Passiflora). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

As those horrendous wild fires continue to rage throughout California, as Cal Fire helicopters roar over, as residents scramble from their homes,  as smoke thickens the air, and as ashes flutter down like feathers, it's difficult to think about...

Posted on Wednesday, October 11, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Insect Wedding Photography: When Three's a Crowd

Insect wedding photography on the passion flower vine: male and female Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So there they were, the bride and groom, culminating their vows. We spotted them in Vacaville, Calif., clinging to a passion flower vine (Passiflora), their host plant--just the two of them, the female Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) and the...

Posted on Friday, October 6, 2017 at 4:44 PM

They Didn't Get the Memo

Gulf Fritillaries are still flying--and mating and laying eggs--in November. This one is nectaring on Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They didn't get the memo. Summer is over. Fall is underway. Winter is coming (Dec. 21). But the Gulf Fritillaries (Agraulis vanillae) are still laying eggs on the passionflower vine here in Vacaville, Calif. The eggs are hatching. The caterpillars are...

Posted on Tuesday, November 8, 2016 at 4:41 PM

Seconds Count When You're Photographing Butterflies

A mating pair of Gulf Fritillaries, Agraulis vanillae. Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you're capturing images of butterflies, seconds count. They're unpredictable. They move from fluttering to fleeting. And just when you're focused on where they are, they aren't there anymore. Where'd they go? Oh, over there! Take the case of the...

Posted on Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 5:12 PM

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