Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Independence Day

Independence Day for a Monarch

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Have you ever seen a monarch butterfly eclose? It's a magical moment. First an egg, then a caterpillar, then a chrysalis, and then a butterfly, Danaus plexippus. We took some images of a monarch eclosing back on Sept. 10, 2016. It was late in the...

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The monarch chrysalis bulges, a sure sign that eclosure is imminent. At right is a newly formed green chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Out it slides. Swoosh! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to wiggle around. Welcome to the world! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to pump up the wings. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just you wait, soon I'll be a familiar looking butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm  swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I'm swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm swinging and swaying. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, as soon as I dry, I'll be off and long gone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, July 4, 2018 at 10:54 AM
Focus Area Tags: Innovation Natural Resources

Happy Independence Day!

A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus,  touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Today we celebrate the Fourth of July, also known as Independence Day. History books tell us that on July 4, 1776, the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, declaring the 13 colonies a new nation and no longer part of the British...

A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus,  touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly eclosed female monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, touches down on an American flag. Another star. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, July 4, 2016 at 9:30 AM

Hurray for the Red, White and Blue!

Hurray for the red, white and blue! One more day until we celebrate the birth of our country, Independence Day, and the patriotic colors will be out in force. Insects, also, can be red, white and blue. Take the red...


"Red" is for the red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).

"Red" is for the red flameskimmer, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey).


"White" is for the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. It's a pest, but its colors are appropriate on Independence Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"White" is for the cabbage white butterfly, Pieris rapae. It's a pest, but its colors are appropriate on Independence Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Blue" is for Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) butterfly. It's as blue as the starry background on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Blue" is for Acmon Blue (Plebejus acmon) butterfly. It's as blue as the starry background on the American flag. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, July 3, 2015 at 4:26 PM
 
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