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Posts Tagged: Leslie Saul-Gershenz

Pollinator Habitat: Important Part of Solar Energy Study

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy should not only be used to benefit global sustainability, but to protect our global ecological systems, including climate, air quality, water and wildlife, says an international team of 16 researchers, including several UC Davis scientists,...

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Solar energy can be used to protect pollinator habitat, according to a research paper published July 9 in the journal Nature. This is Anthophora urbana, a ground-nesting solitary bee which has a broad distribution including the Mojave Desert. It is a floral generalist collecting pollen and nectar from many species of plants, says UC Davis entomologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Native bee Megachile sp. on Mentzelia flower in the Mojave Desert. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Why Silver Digger Bees Are Like Gold

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Why silver digger bees are like gold... Remember those "long lost" silver digger bees found last week at the San Francisco Presidio? They hadn't been seen in large aggregations for nearly a century. And yet there they were in the newly restored sand...

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)
Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Close-up of female silver digger bee, Habropoda miserabilis, taken at Waldport, Ore. in 2015. (Copyrighted Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with Permission)

Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males.  (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)
Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males. (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)

Habropoda miserabilis male and female—the male is mate-guarding the female after mating with her, preventing her from mating with other males. (Copyrighted photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz. Used with permission)

This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.
This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.

This graphic, the work of Leslie Saul-Gershenz, details information on the male and female of the species.

What's in a Name? Leslie Saul-Gershenz and Norm Gershenz

Leslie Saul-Gershenz, who received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis in May 2017 and is the co-founder of SaveNature.Org, has a moth species named for her: Ethmia lesliesaulae.

Imagine having an insect named for you. How awesome is that? It's especially an honor when a duo--a husband-and-wife nature conservation team--is singled out for that recognition. Leslie Saul-Gershenz (she holds a doctorate in entomology from UC Davis)...

Leslie Saul-Gershenz, who received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis in May 2017 and is the co-founder of SaveNature.Org, has a moth species named for her: Ethmia lesliesaulae.
Leslie Saul-Gershenz, who received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis in May 2017 and is the co-founder of SaveNature.Org, has a moth species named for her: Ethmia lesliesaulae.

Leslie Saul-Gershenz, who received her doctorate in entomology from UC Davis in May 2017 and is the co-founder of SaveNature.Org, has a moth species named for her: Ethmia lesliesaulae.

Norman Gershenz is the chief executive officer/co-founder of SaveNature.Org and director of the Insect Discovery Lab. He has a moth species named for him: Ethmia normgershenzi.
Norman Gershenz is the chief executive officer/co-founder of SaveNature.Org and director of the Insect Discovery Lab. He has a moth species named for him: Ethmia normgershenzi.

Norman Gershenz is the chief executive officer/co-founder of SaveNature.Org and director of the Insect Discovery Lab. He has a moth species named for him: Ethmia normgershenzi.

Posted on Monday, December 18, 2017 at 5:00 PM

The Amazing Bee-Parasite Research of Leslie Saul-Gershenz

Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.

Evolutionary ecologist Leslie Saul-Gershenz goes places where many have been but few have ever really seen.  Bees and blister beetles, yes. We remember writing about her work in April of 2013 when she addressed the Nor Cal Entomology Society (now...

Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.
Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.

Leslie Saul-Gershenz in the Channel Island National Park conducting a native bee survey.

Leslie Saul-Gershenz doing field work on bee nesting beds of the solitary bee, Nomia melanderi, in Walla Walla, Wash. (2010-2015).
Leslie Saul-Gershenz doing field work on bee nesting beds of the solitary bee, Nomia melanderi, in Walla Walla, Wash. (2010-2015).

Leslie Saul-Gershenz doing field work on bee nesting beds of the solitary bee, Nomia melanderi, in Walla Walla, Wash. (2010-2015).

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister beetle larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)
A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister beetle larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

A digger bee, Habropoda pallida, with blister beetle larvae. (Photo by Leslie Saul-Gershenz)

Congratulations, Rei!

Rei Scampavia with her first-place research poster, “Farming Practices Affect Nest Site Selection of Native Ground Nesting Bees.

Let's hear it for Rei! Margaret “Rei” Scampavia, a doctoral candidate who studies with major professors Neal Williams and Edwin Lewis of the Department of Entomology and Nematology, won first place for her research poster at the recent UC...

Rei Scampavia with her first-place research poster, “Farming Practices Affect Nest Site Selection of Native Ground Nesting Bees.
Rei Scampavia with her first-place research poster, “Farming Practices Affect Nest Site Selection of Native Ground Nesting Bees." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rei Scampavia with her first-place research poster, “Farming Practices Affect Nest Site Selection of Native Ground Nesting Bees." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, June 3, 2015 at 5:01 PM

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