Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Lynn Kimsey

A Bee-Line to the Bohart Museum: T-Shirts and Calendars

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Folks are making a bee-line to the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis, for its spring sale. All proceeds support the insect museum in its educational and outreach activities. The gift shop is offering a selection of...

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bohart associate Fran Keller, an assistant professor at Folsom Lake College and a UC Davis alumnus (she received her doctorate in entomology studying with Lynn Kimsey) holds some of the new dragonfly t-shirts available at the Bohart Museum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Brennan Dyer, a research associate at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, staffing the Bohart Museum's gift shop. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Normally, locusts are introverted creatures; they do not socialize unless it is for reproduction." This is what one of Lynn Kimsey's students wrote in an exam, and what artist Karissa Merritt interpreted for the Bohart Museum's innovative calendar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Normally, locusts are introverted creatures; they do not socialize unless it is for reproduction." This is what one of Lynn Kimsey's students wrote in an exam, and what artist Karissa Merritt interpreted for the Bohart Museum's innovative calendar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 18, 2019 at 5:08 PM
Focus Area Tags: Family Innovation

Don't Yell 'Yecch' and Run for Cover!

Children at the Bohart Museum of Entomology program at the Vacaville Public Library display different reactions when the bugs appear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The message was clear. If you see a “creepy crawler,” don't yell “yecch!” and run for cover—or the nearest exit. Instead, say “Interesting!” Insects should delight you, not frighten you. That's what Tabatha...

Children at the Bohart Museum of Entomology program at the Vacaville Public Library display different reactions when the bugs appear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Children at the Bohart Museum of Entomology program at the Vacaville Public Library display different reactions when the bugs appear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Children at the Bohart Museum of Entomology program at the Vacaville Public Library display different reactions when the bugs appear. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, yes, the word to say not
Oh, yes, the word to say not "yecch!" but "interesting." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, yes, the word to say not "yecch!" but "interesting." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator at the Bohart Museum, displays insect specimens at the Vacaville Public Library. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator at the Bohart Museum, displays insect specimens at the Vacaville Public Library. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tabatha Yang, education and outreach coordinator at the Bohart Museum, displays insect specimens at the Vacaville Public Library. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tabatha Yang (background) of the Bohart Museum of Entomology talks about insects while the child, a sculpture, reads in the foreground at the Vacaville Public Library. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Tabatha Yang (background) of the Bohart Museum of Entomology talks about insects while the child, a sculpture, reads in the foreground at the Vacaville Public Library. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tabatha Yang (background) of the Bohart Museum of Entomology talks about insects while the child, a sculpture, reads in the foreground at the Vacaville Public Library. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A stick insect is about to crawl up the arm of Tabatha Yang.
A stick insect is about to crawl up the arm of Tabatha Yang. "It thinks I'm a tree," she said. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A stick insect is about to crawl up the arm of Tabatha Yang. "It thinks I'm a tree," she said. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, cool, we get to touch and hold the Madagascar hissing cockroaches! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oh, cool, we get to touch and hold the Madagascar hissing cockroaches! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oh, cool, we get to touch and hold the Madagascar hissing cockroaches! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Here we come, ready or not! Who's first? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Here we come, ready or not! Who's first? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Here we come, ready or not! Who's first? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It tickles! Madagascar hissing cockroach moves a bit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It tickles! Madagascar hissing cockroach moves a bit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It tickles! Madagascar hissing cockroach moves a bit. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No, I'm not going to eat it. But maybe... (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
No, I'm not going to eat it. But maybe... (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

No, I'm not going to eat it. But maybe... (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An Australian stick insect is transferred from one hand to another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An Australian stick insect is transferred from one hand to another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An Australian stick insect is transferred from one hand to another. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 28, 2019 at 6:39 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Family Innovation

Why You Should Love Spiders--Or at Least Like Them!

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

We recently posted information about the Bohart Museum of Entomology's upcoming open house on "Eight-Legged Wonders," and several people responded that they absolutely HATE spiders, and that we should have prefaced it with a SPOILER ALERT: "SPIDER...

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider dining on a stink bug. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A crab spider has just snared a green bottle fly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the camouflaged crab spider on the sedum. Honey bee, be aware. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This spider is simply stunning. It's a redfemured spotted orbwever, Neoscona domiciliorum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A jumping spider peers at the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This crab spider, on a blanket flower or Gaillardia, is a camouflaged green. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a wrap. An orbweaver has wrapped a bee, while a freeloader fly takes a bite. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Visit to the Bohart Museum

UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you're 5 years old, the world is full of wonders. Especially when your mother takes you to the Bohart Museum of Entomology to see the butterfly specimens. Such was the case when Cash Belden, 5, and his mother, Michelle Belden (she's the...

UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis employee Michele Belden shows her son, Cash, 5, some of the butterflies in the Bohart Museum of Entomology. Belden manages the Aggie Surplus, formerly Bargain Barn, on campus. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, shows a drawer full of butterflies to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, shows a drawer full of butterflies to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, shows a drawer full of butterflies to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, talks to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. In back is Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas, naturalist and photographer who helps conduct the butterfly/moth specimen tours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, talks to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. In back is Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas, naturalist and photographer who helps conduct the butterfly/moth specimen tours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith, curator of the Lepitopdera section at the Bohart Museum, talks to Michelle Belden and son, Cash, 5. In back is Bohart associate Greg Kareofelas, naturalist and photographer who helps conduct the butterfly/moth specimen tours. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cash Belden, 5, smiles at the camera as he stands next to a drawer full of monarch specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cash Belden, 5, smiles at the camera as he stands next to a drawer full of monarch specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cash Belden, 5, smiles at the camera as he stands next to a drawer full of monarch specimens. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, February 27, 2019 at 5:00 PM

In Search of the World's Biggest Bee: How It Came to 'Bee'

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests  in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)

Imagine you're in an Indonesian rainforest and a humongous bee, with a wingspan of two and a half inches, flies over your head. The world's largest bee, known as Wallace's Giant Bee (Megachile pluto), considered extinct since 1981, lives. It's not...

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests  in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)
Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)

Natural history photographer Clay Bolt photographs Wallace’s Giant See in its nest. The bee nests in active termite mounds in the North Moluccas, Indonesia. (Copyright Simon Robson)

Wallace’s Giant Bee. Megachile pluto, the world’s largest bee,  is approximately four times larger than a European honey bee. This is a composite. (Copyright Clay Bolt, www.claybolt.com)
Wallace’s Giant Bee. Megachile pluto, the world’s largest bee, is approximately four times larger than a European honey bee. This is a composite. (Copyright Clay Bolt, www.claybolt.com)

Wallace’s Giant Bee. Megachile pluto, the world’s largest bee, is approximately four times larger than a European honey bee. This is a composite. (Copyright Clay Bolt, www.claybolt.com)

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu