Email Print Site Map
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Papilio rutulus

A Tiger by the Tail

A longhorn bee, probably Melissodes agilis, has this

One of Buck Owens' signature songs that never failed to please his fan base was "I Got a Tiger by the Tail." The Country-Hall-of-Fame singer, who died in 2006 at age 76, said the lyrics came to him after he noticed a gas station sign advertising "Put a...

Posted on Wednesday, August 9, 2017 at 4:22 PM

The Bee and the Tiger

A male longhorn bee, probably a Melisoddes agilis, targets a Western tiger swallowtail nectaring on Tithonia in Vacavile, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about a butterfly ballet... A large Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, with a wingspan of about four inches, flutters into the Vacaville, Calif. pollinator garden and lands on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia). It proceeds to nectar, unaware...

Posted on Thursday, August 3, 2017 at 4:39 PM

Hurrah for the Red, White and Blue!

The red: The firecracker red flameskimmer dragonfly, Libellula saturata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's the Fourth of July, and amid our celebration of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence 241 years ago on July 4, 1776 and our glorious nation, we celebrate the red, white and blue--the colors of our flag. But in the insect world, we can...

Posted on Tuesday, July 4, 2017 at 7:59 AM

The Flora and the Fauna at the Old State Capitol

A Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus) spreads its wings on the grounds of the Benicia State Capitol. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Erected in 1852, this historic building was ostensibly intended for Benicia City Hall. Offered as the state capitol and promptly accepted, it had that honor from February 4, 1853 to February 25, 1854. Deeded to the state in 1951, it was one of the four...

Posted on Wednesday, June 14, 2017 at 4:29 PM

Like a Ballerina on the Dance Floor of Life

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus,warms its flight muscles on a crape myrtle tree. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Like a ballerina on the dance floor of life, a newly eclosed Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, flutters from its host plant, a sycamore tree, to a crape myrtle. The yellow-and-black butterfly spreads its wings, warming its flight muscles. It...

Posted on Monday, May 15, 2017 at 6:15 PM

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu