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Posts Tagged: Rachel Vannette

UC Davis Community Ecologist Rachel Vannette: Hellman Fellowship to Research Pollinator Microbiomes

A honey bee heads for a lupine blossom. Nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator’s foraging preference, according to UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette, recipient of a Hellman Fellowship. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Congratulations to community ecologist Rachel Vannette, assistant professor in the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology: she was just selected as one of the 11 campus recipients of a Hellman Fellowship grant. Vannette, who researches...

A honey bee heads for a lupine blossom. Nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator’s foraging preference, according to UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette, recipient of a Hellman Fellowship. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads for a lupine blossom. Nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator’s foraging preference, according to UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette, recipient of a Hellman Fellowship. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads for a lupine blossom. Nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator’s foraging preference, according to UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette, recipient of a Hellman Fellowship. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What's New in Entomology/Nematology Seminars

Entomologist Fiona Goggin of the University of Arkansas studies plant defenses. A UC Davis alumnus, she will return to the campus Jan. 17 to present a seminar. Here aphids suck out plant juices in a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology is gearing up for a plethora of seminars for the winter quarter--ranging from understanding insect behavior to understanding biodiversity. The department launched the seminars  Wednesday, Jan. 10...

Entomologist Fiona Goggin of the University of Arkansas studies plant defenses. A UC Davis alumnus, she will return to the campus Jan. 17 to present a seminar. Here aphids suck out plant juices in a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Fiona Goggin of the University of Arkansas studies plant defenses. A UC Davis alumnus, she will return to the campus Jan. 17 to present a seminar. Here aphids suck out plant juices in a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Fiona Goggin of the University of Arkansas studies plant defenses. A UC Davis alumnus, she will return to the campus Jan. 17 to present a seminar. Here aphids suck out plant juices in a rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ash Zemenick: 'Do Flower Visitors Network with Floral Microbes?'

Flowers bloom at this high elevation meadow, which was  community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site in the Tahoe National Forest. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)

Have you ever thought about all those diverse pollinators you see foraging on flowers? Have you ever considered them as important vectors of floral microbes? Well, they are! Community ecologist Ash Zemenick, formerly in the graduate student program of...

Flowers bloom at this high elevation meadow, which was  community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site in the Tahoe National Forest. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)
Flowers bloom at this high elevation meadow, which was community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site in the Tahoe National Forest. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)

Flowers bloom at this high elevation meadow, which was community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site in the Tahoe National Forest. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)

The Tahoe National Forest backgrounds community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)
The Tahoe National Forest backgrounds community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)

The Tahoe National Forest backgrounds community ecologist Ash Zemenick's field study site. (Photo by Ash Zemenick)

Intriguing Topic: Social Evolution in Social Insects

A close encounter between a honey bee and a velvety tree ant (Liometopum occidentale) on a lavender blossom; both are social insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Intriguing topic: social evolution in social insects... The UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology has booked associate professor of biology Tim Linksvayer of the University of Pennsylvania for a seminar on “Genomic Signatures of...

A close encounter between a honey bee and a velvety tree ant (Liometopum occidentale) on a lavender blossom; both are social insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A close encounter between a honey bee and a velvety tree ant (Liometopum occidentale) on a lavender blossom; both are social insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A close encounter between a honey bee and a velvety tree ant (Liometopum occidentale) on a lavender blossom; both are social insects. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 2, 2017 at 5:37 PM

What Attracts Bees to Blossoms? A Surprising Discovery by UC Davis Ecologist Rachel Vannette

A honey bee heads toward a lupine blossom. It's not just the nectar she's scented. UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette has just published a paper in New Phytologist journal that shows nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator's foraging preference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You're watching honey bees foraging in a field.  They buzz toward a blossom, sip nectar, and then head for another blossom. Typical, right? But there's much more going on than you think. It's not just the nectar that she's scented. UC Davis...

A honey bee heads toward a lupine blossom. It's not just the nectar she's scented. UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette has just published a paper in New Phytologist journal that shows nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator's foraging preference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee heads toward a lupine blossom. It's not just the nectar she's scented. UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette has just published a paper in New Phytologist journal that shows nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator's foraging preference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee heads toward a lupine blossom. It's not just the nectar she's scented. UC Davis community ecologist Rachel Vannette has just published a paper in New Phytologist journal that shows nectar-living microbes release scents or volatile compounds, too, and can influence a pollinator's foraging preference. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Microbial stains (fungi and bacteria) isolated from floral nectar. (Photo by Rachel Vannette)
Microbial stains (fungi and bacteria) isolated from floral nectar. (Photo by Rachel Vannette)

Microbial stains (fungi and bacteria) isolated from floral nectar. (Photo by Rachel Vannette)

This is the electroantennogram (EAG) assay set-up. (Photo by Bryan Smith, USDA-ARS)
This is the electroantennogram (EAG) assay set-up. (Photo by Bryan Smith, USDA-ARS)

This is the electroantennogram (EAG) assay set-up. (Photo by Bryan Smith, USDA-ARS)

Posted on Thursday, September 28, 2017 at 5:00 PM

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