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Posts Tagged: Scott Carroll

Why They're Cautioning: 'Use Antimicrobials Wisely'

The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that

UC Davis evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues are on a mission. When the United Nations meets Sept. 21 in New York, they want the UN to reframe its action on the global antimicrobial drug resistance (AMR) crisis. It's crucial. How...

The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that
The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that "can no longer be cured with many older antibiotics or medicines." (Photo by Anthony Cornel, UC Davis)

The malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae. Evolutionary ecologist Scott Carroll and colleagues point to a World Health Organization paper indicating that malaria is one of the diseases that "can no longer be cured with many older antibiotics or medicines." (Photo by Anthony Cornel, UC Davis)

Posted on Monday, September 19, 2016 at 4:00 PM

Forget the Soaps: Let's Talk Soapberry Bugs!

Meredith Cenzer in front of her computer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A soap opera is usually defined as a drama performed as a serial on daytime TV. But soapberry bugs and the people who study them are much more interesting!  Forget the soaps; let's talk about soapberry bugs and an entomologist at the University of...

Meredith Cenzer in front of her computer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Meredith Cenzer in front of her computer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Meredith Cenzer in front of her computer. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Soapberry bugs, Jadera haematoloma. (Photos by entomologist and soapberry expert Scott Carroll of UC Davis)
Soapberry bugs, Jadera haematoloma. (Photos by entomologist and soapberry expert Scott Carroll of UC Davis)

Soapberry bugs, Jadera haematoloma. (Photos by entomologist and soapberry expert Scott Carroll of UC Davis)

Posted on Wednesday, August 24, 2016 at 5:29 PM

Can You Keep a Secret?

UC Davis student Kelly Aoyama works on a painting that will be displayed June 3 at a public art exhibit in Davis. (Photo by Diane Ullman)

Can you keep a secret? The secret world of insects? And unleash the secret of soapberry bugs? Students in the Entomology 1 class, offered by the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, studied soapberry bugs under the tutelage of...

UC Davis student Kelly Aoyama works on a painting that will be displayed June 3 at a public art exhibit in Davis. (Photo by Diane Ullman)
UC Davis student Kelly Aoyama works on a painting that will be displayed June 3 at a public art exhibit in Davis. (Photo by Diane Ullman)

UC Davis student Kelly Aoyama works on a painting that will be displayed June 3 at a public art exhibit in Davis. (Photo by Diane Ullman)

These are soapberry bugs photographed near the Ruth Risdon Storer Gardens, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
These are soapberry bugs photographed near the Ruth Risdon Storer Gardens, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These are soapberry bugs photographed near the Ruth Risdon Storer Gardens, UC Davis Arboretum. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 1, 2015 at 4:11 PM

Fifty Shades of Gray (and Red)

A lone soapberry bug searching for a mate in the UC Davis Arboretum, off Garrod Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ah, soapberry bugs... They'll never get top billing in a racy novel, let alone star in an R-rated movie. The "R" word comes into play only when they're referred to as "the rapidly evolving soapberry bugs" or when scientists talk about...

A lone soapberry bug searching for a mate in the UC Davis Arboretum, off Garrod Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A lone soapberry bug searching for a mate in the UC Davis Arboretum, off Garrod Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A lone soapberry bug searching for a mate in the UC Davis Arboretum, off Garrod Drive. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Love in the UC Davis Arboretum, the insect version of
Love in the UC Davis Arboretum, the insect version of "Fifty Shades of Gray (and Red)." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Love in the UC Davis Arboretum, the insect version of "Fifty Shades of Gray (and Red)." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two's company, but three's a crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two's company, but three's a crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two's company, but three's a crowd. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's time for the third one to wander off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's time for the third one to wander off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's time for the third one to wander off. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 2, 2015 at 5:18 PM

Helping to Meet Global Challenges Through Evolutionary Biology

The pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton, has evolved resistance to genetically modified   cotton in India, but not in Arizona where farmers have planted refuges of conventional cotton to reduce   selection for resistance. (Photo by Alex Yelich, University of Arizona)

Two categories of evolutionary challenges result from escalating human impacts on the planet. The first arises from cancers, pathogens and pests that evolve too quickly, and the second from the inability of many valued species to adapt...

The pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton, has evolved resistance to genetically modified   cotton in India, but not in Arizona where farmers have planted refuges of conventional cotton to reduce   selection for resistance. (Photo by Alex Yelich, University of Arizona)
The pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton, has evolved resistance to genetically modified cotton in India, but not in Arizona where farmers have planted refuges of conventional cotton to reduce selection for resistance. (Photo by Alex Yelich, University of Arizona)

The pink bollworm, a global pest of cotton, has evolved resistance to genetically modified cotton in India, but not in Arizona where farmers have planted refuges of conventional cotton to reduce selection for resistance. (Photo by Alex Yelich, University of Arizona)

Posted on Thursday, September 11, 2014 at 5:33 PM

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