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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: Spanish lavender

UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale: Think Pollinators!

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think bees. Think butterflies. Think plants that will attract them. The UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden is hosting its first in a series of fall plant sales on Saturday, Oct. 7 at the Arboretum Teaching Nursery on Garrod Drive, UC Davis...

Posted on Thursday, October 5, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Why Dead Bees Can Sting

A California scrub jay nails a honey bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Can dead bees sting? Yes, they can. Here's the scenario: Our pollinator garden is buzzing with the sights and sounds of honey bees.  Ah, spring! A few feet away, California scrub jays are nesting in the cherry laurel hedges. They leave periodically...

Posted on Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at 4:39 PM

Ol' Blue Eyes: A Blue-Eyed Darner

A Rhionaeschna multicolor blue-eyed darner, Aeshna multicolor, soaking up sun on a Spanish lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ol' Blue Eyes. What a treat to see. No, not an old movie starring Ol' Blue Eyes himself, Frank Sinatra (1915-1998), but the blue-eyed darner, the Rhionaeschna multicolor blue-eyed darner, Aeshna multicolor. Order: Odonata Suborder: Anisoptera...

Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2017 at 10:00 AM

Not a Good Day for the Jumping Spider

A honey bee narrowly avoids the outstretched jumping spider,  a Phidippus audax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sometimes you get lucky. Sometimes you go hungry. Take the case of the huge jumping spider (a female Phidippus audax or bold jumping spider, as identified by Wade Spencer of the UC Davis Bohart Museum of Entomology) hanging out in our Spanish lavender....

Posted on Wednesday, March 29, 2017 at 3:08 PM

Helicoptering in on the Spanish Lavender

A honey bee nectaring on Spanish lavender. This was taken with a Nikon D500 and a 200mm macro lens. Settings: ISO 3200, f-stop 13, and shutter speed of 1/640 of a second. No flash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you like writing with light (photography), then you'll probably love capturing images of honey bees spinning like helicopters. In the late afternoon, when the light softens, head over to your favorite Spanish lavender patch. Pull up a chair, listen...

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