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Posts Tagged: Steve Seybold

Meet the 'Extreme Insects' Aug. 19 at Bohart Museum of Entomology Open House

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about extremes! Have you ever thought about how some insects have adapted to fire, ice, acid, hot water, salt and the desert? Have you ever seen an ambrosia beetle, a red turpentine beetle, an ice cricket, a brine fly or a sand wasp? You will if...

This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey
This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

This is part of the beetle collection at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A sand wasp, Bembix americana, foraging on seaside daisies at Bodega Bay. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Praying Mantis Named Cupcake Greets Visitors at the Bohart Museum

Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Most bakers define a "cupcake" as a a small cake designed to serve one person--and one that can be baked in a paper or aluminum cup in a muffin tin. Not UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz, treasurer of the UC Davis Entomology Club. "Cupcake"...

Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Cupcake, a Rhombodera megaera praying mantis, perches on the hand of her owner, UC Davis animal biology major, Crystal Homicz. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz holds Cupcake, her  Rhombodera megaera praying mantis. It is a native of Asia and the species is one of the largest in the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz holds Cupcake, her Rhombodera megaera praying mantis. It is a native of Asia and the species is one of the largest in the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis animal biology major Crystal Homicz holds Cupcake, her Rhombodera megaera praying mantis. It is a native of Asia and the species is one of the largest in the world. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trio of Napa visitors (from left) teacher Marykay Osborn,  Abby Jurgens and Olivia Hamilton, 11, (one of Osborn's students) check out Cupcake, the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Trio of Napa visitors (from left) teacher Marykay Osborn, Abby Jurgens and Olivia Hamilton, 11, (one of Osborn's students) check out Cupcake, the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Trio of Napa visitors (from left) teacher Marykay Osborn, Abby Jurgens and Olivia Hamilton, 11, (one of Osborn's students) check out Cupcake, the praying mantis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, February 19, 2018 at 4:09 PM
Focus Area Tags: Environment Natural Resources

Jackson Audley: A Case Study with the Walnut Twig Beetle

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So tiny and so destructive. It's about the size of a grain of rice but it's a killer. That's the walnut twig beetle, Pityophthorus juglandis, which in association with a newly described fungus, Geosmithia morbida, causes thousand cankers disease,...

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The walnut twig beetle is about the size of a grain of rice. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If You Fuse Art With Science, This Is for You!

Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture.  The occasion: a  show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you fuse art with science, this is for you.  Like to draw, paint, or photograph insects? Or use other mediums, including textiles, sculpture, video and mixed media? Or engage in other science/art subjects? You're invited to enter...

Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture.  The occasion: a  show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture. The occasion: a show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist-artist Diane Ullman, UC Davis professor of entomology, looks over insect art with fellow UC Davis faculty affiliate Steve Seybold, research entomologist with the Pacific Southwest Research Station, U.S. Department of Food and Agriculture. The occasion: a show to showcase the work of Ullman's students in 2015 in Entomology 1. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly  (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A red flameskimmer dragonfly (Libellula saturata) perches on a bamboo stake in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 9, 2017 at 5:37 PM

The Day That The Beetles Invaded the Bohart

USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Just call it "The Day that the Beetles Invaded the Bohart." That would be the recent open house at the Bohart Museum of Entomology, University of California, Davis, on "Bark Beetles and Forest Health," coordinated by USDA Forest Service research...

USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

USDA Forest Research entomologist Steve Seybold (foreground) and UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker peel bark to reveal larvae of bark beetles and wood borers. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker examines a conifer for beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker examines a conifer for beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis graduate student Corwin Parker examines a conifer for beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Children flocked to the crafts table to create art focused on bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Children flocked to the crafts table to create art focused on bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Children flocked to the crafts table to create art focused on bark beetles. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natalie Seybold (left) works on bark beetle art. In the background is Bohart Museum associate Mai Lundy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Natalie Seybold (left) works on bark beetle art. In the background is Bohart Museum associate Mai Lundy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Natalie Seybold (left) works on bark beetle art. In the background is Bohart Museum associate Mai Lundy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bark beetle art in the making--this is the work of Natalie Seybold of Davis. She is coloring  an outline of a Dendroctonus sp. bark beetle, probably the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, or the great spruce beetle, Dendroctonus micans.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bark beetle art in the making--this is the work of Natalie Seybold of Davis. She is coloring an outline of a Dendroctonus sp. bark beetle, probably the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, or the great spruce beetle, Dendroctonus micans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bark beetle art in the making--this is the work of Natalie Seybold of Davis. She is coloring an outline of a Dendroctonus sp. bark beetle, probably the red turpentine beetle, Dendroctonus valens, or the great spruce beetle, Dendroctonus micans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is staining to a cross section of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, by a blue-staining fungus carried by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis. In the background: pitch tubes around the entrance holes of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, on the bark surface of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is staining to a cross section of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, by a blue-staining fungus carried by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis. In the background: pitch tubes around the entrance holes of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, on the bark surface of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is staining to a cross section of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa, by a blue-staining fungus carried by the western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis. In the background: pitch tubes around the entrance holes of western pine beetle, Dendroctonus brevicomis, on the bark surface of ponderosa pine, Pinus ponderosa.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Wade Spencer, a UC Davis undergraduate student and Bohart Museum associate, reads a children's book,
Entomologist Wade Spencer, a UC Davis undergraduate student and Bohart Museum associate, reads a children's book, "Beetle Bedlam." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Wade Spencer, a UC Davis undergraduate student and Bohart Museum associate, reads a children's book, "Beetle Bedlam." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 18, 2017 at 4:14 PM

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