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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Bee Symposium

Pollinator Gardens Make Us Happy: Get Ready for National Pollinator Week!

This is an overview of part of Kate Frey's pollinator garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Are you ready for National Pollinator Week, June 18-June 24? A spectacular pollinator garden that's a "must-see" is Kate Frey's pollinator garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. Kate Frey, a world-class pollinator garden designer, pollinator advocate and author...

This is an overview of part of Kate Frey's pollinator garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This is an overview of part of Kate Frey's pollinator garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an overview of part of Kate Frey's pollinator garden at Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pipevine swallowtail, Battus philenor, nectars on on Nepeta tuberosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pipevine swallowtail, Battus philenor, nectars on on Nepeta tuberosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pipevine swallowtail, Battus philenor, nectars on on Nepeta tuberosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for Stachys bullata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-packing yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for Stachys bullata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, heads for Stachys bullata. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee can't get enough of Scabiosa
This honey bee can't get enough of Scabiosa "Fama Blue." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This honey bee can't get enough of Scabiosa "Fama Blue." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Milkweed is not only the host plant of monarch butterflies, but honey bees like it, too. This is  the showy milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Milkweed is not only the host plant of monarch butterflies, but honey bees like it, too. This is the showy milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Milkweed is not only the host plant of monarch butterflies, but honey bees like it, too. This is the showy milkweed, Asclepias speciosa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Kate Frey: Bee Gardens Make Us Happy

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on Salvia

Whether you plant them, nurture them, or walk through them, bee gardens make us happy. That's what world-class pollinator garden designer, pollinator advocate and author Kate Frey told the crowd at the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium, hosted by the...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on Salvia
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on Salvia "Indigo Spires" in Kate Frey's pollinator garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, on Salvia "Indigo Spires" in Kate Frey's pollinator garden at the Sonoma Cornerstone. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 28, 2018 at 4:44 PM

Bumble Bees on the Move

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bumble bees stole the show during the Graduate Student Poster Research Competition at the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium, themed "Keeping Bees Healthy." John Mola, a fourth-year doctoral student in the Neal Williams lab, UC Davis Department of...

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A bumble bee, Bombus melanopygus, nectaring on lavender in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola won the Graduate Student Research Poster Competition at the UC Davis Bee Symposium with his work on bumble bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student John Mola won the Graduate Student Research Poster Competition at the UC Davis Bee Symposium with his work on bumble bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola won the Graduate Student Research Poster Competition at the UC Davis Bee Symposium with his work on bumble bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page stands by her research poster on honey bees that won second place at the UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page stands by her research poster on honey bees that won second place at the UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page stands by her research poster on honey bees that won second place at the UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola explains his research to the judging panel. From left are Mea McNeil, timer; Santiago Ramirez of the UC Davis Evolution and Ecology faculty; Tom Seeley of Cornell, the keynote speaker at the symposium; and Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student John Mola explains his research to the judging panel. From left are Mea McNeil, timer; Santiago Ramirez of the UC Davis Evolution and Ecology faculty; Tom Seeley of Cornell, the keynote speaker at the symposium; and Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student John Mola explains his research to the judging panel. From left are Mea McNeil, timer; Santiago Ramirez of the UC Davis Evolution and Ecology faculty; Tom Seeley of Cornell, the keynote speaker at the symposium; and Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page tells judges that honey bees may have negative impacts on native bees and native plant communities in certain contexts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page tells judges that honey bees may have negative impacts on native bees and native plant communities in certain contexts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis doctoral student Maureen Page tells judges that honey bees may have negative impacts on native bees and native plant communities in certain contexts. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The panel of judges conferring. In the foreground is timer Mea McNeil. In back (from left) are judges Robbin Thorp and Santiago Ramirez of UC Davis, and Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The panel of judges conferring. In the foreground is timer Mea McNeil. In back (from left) are judges Robbin Thorp and Santiago Ramirez of UC Davis, and Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The panel of judges conferring. In the foreground is timer Mea McNeil. In back (from left) are judges Robbin Thorp and Santiago Ramirez of UC Davis, and Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Tom Seeley: 'Bees Are Superb Beekeepers'

"Honey bees are superb beekeepers; they know what they're doing." So said bee scientist and author Tom Seeley of Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y., when he keynoted the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium, held March 3 in the UC Davis Conference...


"Honey bees are superb beekeepers; they know what they're doing," keynote speaker Tom Seeley tells the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Honey bees are superb beekeepers; they know what they're doing," keynote speaker Tom Seeley tells the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"EVERYTHING that colonies do when they are living on their own (not being managed by beekeepers) is done to favor their survival and their reproduction, and thus their success is contribution to the next generation of colonies," Cornell bee scientist Tom Seeley pointed out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"EVERYTHING that colonies do when they are living on their own (not being managed by beekeepers) is done to favor their survival and their reproduction, and thus their success is contribution to the next generation of colonies," Cornell bee scientist Tom Seeley pointed out. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)


"Darwinian beekeeping is allowing the bees to use their own beekeeping skills fully," keynote speaker Tom Seeley says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Darwinian beekeeping is allowing the bees to use their own beekeeping skills fully," keynote speaker Tom Seeley says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Neal Williams (left) of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, shares a laugh with keynote speaker Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Professor Neal Williams (left) of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, shares a laugh with keynote speaker Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Professor Neal Williams (left) of the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology, shares a laugh with keynote speaker Tom Seeley of Cornell. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All Systems Are 'Bee' for UC Davis Bee Symposium

Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

All systems are "bee" for the fourth annual UC Davis Bee Symposium: Keeping Bees Healthy, on Saturday, March 3. Except for a little liquid sunshine. Unexpected rain, however, won't deter beekeepers, bee scientists and other bee enthusiasts from...

Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Odds are, due to the rain, you won't find any bees flying around Davis during the UC Davis Bee Symposium, but you might find a rainbow or a reflection. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, March 1, 2018 at 5:00 PM

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