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Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematolgoy

Ag Award Recipient Rachael Freeman Long: A UC Davis Professor Sparked Her Interest in Biocontrol

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her  family farm in Yolo County in  April of 2015.

Rachael Freeman Long treasures her memories as a graduate student in entomology at the University of California, Davis. She remembers eating fried grasshoppers at a party. "They're okay with a lot of spices!" She remembers watching Professor Harry H....

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her  family farm in Yolo County in  April of 2015.
Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her family farm in Yolo County in April of 2015. "Hedgerows are important for enhancing beneficial insects, including bees and natural enemies, for better biocontrol and crop pollination in adjacent field crops, with measurable economic benefits," she says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Rachael Long, UCCE farm advisor, leads a tour of her family farm in Yolo County in April of 2015. "Hedgerows are important for enhancing beneficial insects, including bees and natural enemies, for better biocontrol and crop pollination in adjacent field crops, with measurable economic benefits," she says. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why Timing Is Everything in Bumble Bee Colonies

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Timing is everything. Especially when it comes to bumble bee colonies. Postdoctoral scholar Rosemary Malfi of the Neal Williams lab, University of California, Davis, will speak on “Timing Is Everything: Bumble Bee Colony Performance in Response...

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenkii, nectaring on Anchusa azurea, of the borage family. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One of Rosemary Malfi's bumble bee colonies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
One of Rosemary Malfi's bumble bee colonies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

One of Rosemary Malfi's bumble bee colonies. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, May 28, 2018 at 8:00 AM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Natural Resources

UC Davis Researchers: Woolly Bear Caterpillars Pick Winner of U.S. Presidential Campaign

UC Davis researchers Rick Karban (left) and his graduate student Eric LoPresti with their chart linking  woolly bear caterpillars  to U.S. Presidential elections. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Score another win for those woolly bear caterpillars. For the past three decades, woolly bear caterpillars have accurately predicted a Republican or Democrat win in the U.S. Presidential elections. This year, despite the pollsters, pundits and...

UC Davis researchers Rick Karban (left) and his graduate student Eric LoPresti with their chart linking  woolly bear caterpillars  to U.S. Presidential elections. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
UC Davis researchers Rick Karban (left) and his graduate student Eric LoPresti with their chart linking woolly bear caterpillars to U.S. Presidential elections. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

UC Davis researchers Rick Karban (left) and his graduate student Eric LoPresti with their chart linking woolly bear caterpillars to U.S. Presidential elections. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of U.S. Presidential election predictions (red designates Republicans and blue, Democrats).
Close-up of U.S. Presidential election predictions (red designates Republicans and blue, Democrats).

Close-up of U.S. Presidential election predictions (red designates Republicans and blue, Democrats).

A woolly bear caterpillar on Bodega Head in 2011. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A woolly bear caterpillar on Bodega Head in 2011. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A woolly bear caterpillar on Bodega Head in 2011. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Woolly bear caterpillars eating lupine in 2008 on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Woolly bear caterpillars eating lupine in 2008 on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Woolly bear caterpillars eating lupine in 2008 on Bodega Head, Sonoma County. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

 
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