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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Bee-ing All You Can Be and See and Do

A native bee, Anthophora urbana, buzzes over a tropical milkweed. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

What a weekend for bee and gardening enthusiasts! It's a shame we all can't clone ourselves and be in two places at the same time! The 40th annual Western Apicultural Society conference at the University of California, Davis, just concluded and now...

UC Davis Faculty, Staff to Offer Expertise at Bee Conference

A honey bee heads for a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Excitement is building for 40th annual Western Apicultural Society (WAS) conference, set Sept. 5-8 at the University of California, Davis, its birthplace. The non-profit educational organization, geared for small-scale beekeepers in the western United...

Posted on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 at 5:19 PM

Why Turning 40 Is a Bee-Boggling Event: Western Apicultural Society's Big Conference

Pointing out the queen bee. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Turning 40 can be mind-boggling. But it will be bee-boggling--all bee-boggling--when the Western Apicultural Society (WAS) meets Sept. 5-8 at the University of California, Davis for its 40th annual conference. So much to do. So much to hear. So much to...

Show Me the Honey: From Your Bees!

A honey bee foraging on star thistle, Centaurea solstitialis. It's an invasive weed but makes great honey, beekeepers and honey connoisseurs say. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Imagine watching your honey bees gathering nectar from star thistle--which some beekeepers claim makes the best honey. (Yes, Centaurea solstitialis is an invasive weed. The love-hate relationship runs deep; farmers and environmentalists hate it;...

The Medfly 'Through the Decades': Tune in to Hear Professor Carey on July 3

Distinguished Professor James R. Carey is known for his outstanding research, outreach and advocacy program involving invasion biology, specifically the Mediterranean Fruit Fly (medfly) and the Light Brown Apple Moth (LBAM). (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Remember when scientists first detected the Mediterranean fruit fly in California? It was the early 1980s. The invasive insect, better known as the medfly (Ceratitis capitata), threatened the state's multi-billion-dollar fruit and vegetable industry,...

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