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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology

Bohart Bugs Grab Interest of Fairgoers

Entomologist Jeff Smith (left) shows insect displays from the Bohart Museum of Entomology to fairgoers last Saturday at the Dixon May Fair.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bugs from the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis, grabbed the interest of fairgoers at the 144th annual Dixon May Fair, held May 9 through May 12. Entomologists Jeff Smith and Alexander "Alex" Dedmon kept busy answering questions on Saturday in the...

Entomologist Jeff Smith (left) shows insect displays from the Bohart Museum of Entomology to fairgoers last Saturday at the Dixon May Fair.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologist Jeff Smith (left) shows insect displays from the Bohart Museum of Entomology to fairgoers last Saturday at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologist Jeff Smith (left) shows insect displays from the Bohart Museum of Entomology to fairgoers last Saturday at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologists Alex Dedon (left) and Jeff Smith of UC Davis engage with Carolyn Jones of Dixon, who served as chair of the 2019 Sacramento Orchid Show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Entomologists Alex Dedon (left) and Jeff Smith of UC Davis engage with Carolyn Jones of Dixon, who served as chair of the 2019 Sacramento Orchid Show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Entomologists Alex Dedon (left) and Jeff Smith of UC Davis engage with Carolyn Jones of Dixon, who served as chair of the 2019 Sacramento Orchid Show. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alex Dedmon, a doctoral student at UC Davis, responds to a question from a fairgoer Saturday at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Forensic entomologist Alex Dedmon, a doctoral student at UC Davis, responds to a question from a fairgoer Saturday at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Forensic entomologist Alex Dedmon, a doctoral student at UC Davis, responds to a question from a fairgoer Saturday at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This fairgoer checked out the specimens of carpenter bees, honey bees, leafcutting bees and sweat bees from the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This fairgoer checked out the specimens of carpenter bees, honey bees, leafcutting bees and sweat bees from the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This fairgoer checked out the specimens of carpenter bees, honey bees, leafcutting bees and sweat bees from the Bohart Museum of Entomology at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An insect display on Hymenotpera (bees and wasps) drew the interest of this fairgoer at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An insect display on Hymenotpera (bees and wasps) drew the interest of this fairgoer at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An insect display on Hymenotpera (bees and wasps) drew the interest of this fairgoer at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Specimens from the order Coleoptera (beetles) fascinated many fairgoers at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Specimens from the order Coleoptera (beetles) fascinated many fairgoers at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Specimens from the order Coleoptera (beetles) fascinated many fairgoers at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camouflaged insects include stick insects that look like leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Camouflaged insects include stick insects that look like leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Camouflaged insects include stick insects that look like leaves. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly specimens from the order Lepitoptera (butterflies and moths) brightened the Bohart Museum of Entomology display at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Butterfly specimens from the order Lepitoptera (butterflies and moths) brightened the Bohart Museum of Entomology display at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Butterfly specimens from the order Lepitoptera (butterflies and moths) brightened the Bohart Museum of Entomology display at the Dixon May Fair. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Floriculture Building at the Dixon May Fair was more than flowers--it included specimens of pollinators and other insects from the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The Floriculture Building at the Dixon May Fair was more than flowers--it included specimens of pollinators and other insects from the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Floriculture Building at the Dixon May Fair was more than flowers--it included specimens of pollinators and other insects from the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The Boys Are Back in Town!

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The boys are back in town. After the long winter and rainy spring, the boys are back in town. That would be the male Valley carpenter bees, Xylocopa varipuncta, or what Robbin Thorp, distinguished emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, calls...

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male Valley carpenter bee, Xylocopa varipuncta, nectaring on a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii, in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee is often mistaken for a bumble bee, or what some have called a
The male Valley carpenter bee is often mistaken for a bumble bee, or what some have called a "golden bumble bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee is often mistaken for a bumble bee, or what some have called a "golden bumble bee." (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee didn't perceive the photographer as a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male Valley carpenter bee didn't perceive the photographer as a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee didn't perceive the photographer as a threat. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee protrudes his proboscis (tongue) to sip nectar from a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The male Valley carpenter bee protrudes his proboscis (tongue) to sip nectar from a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The male Valley carpenter bee protrudes his proboscis (tongue) to sip nectar from a tower of jewels, Echium wildpretii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And off he goes, a male Valley carpenter bee in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
And off he goes, a male Valley carpenter bee in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

And off he goes, a male Valley carpenter bee in flight. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why Insect Studies Can Tell Us a Lot About Human Longevity

James R. Carey, distinguished professor of entomology, is the author of a landmark study published in the journal Science in 1992 that showed mortality of Mediterranean fruit flies (medflies) slows at older ages. This is an image by photographer Jack Kelly Clark, formerly of the UC Integrated Pest Management Program.

Insects can tell us a lot about human longevity. James R. Carey, UC Davis distinguished professor of entomology, will discuss "What Can Insect Studies Tell Us about Longevity and Aging? Lots!" at his UC Davis Emeriti Association presentation at 11:30...

James R. Carey, distinguished professor of entomology, is the author of a landmark study published in the journal Science in 1992 that showed mortality of Mediterranean fruit flies (medflies) slows at older ages. This is an image by photographer Jack Kelly Clark, formerly of the UC Integrated Pest Management Program.
James R. Carey, distinguished professor of entomology, is the author of a landmark study published in the journal Science in 1992 that showed mortality of Mediterranean fruit flies (medflies) slows at older ages. This is an image by photographer Jack Kelly Clark, formerly of the UC Integrated Pest Management Program.

James R. Carey, distinguished professor of entomology, is the author of a landmark study published in the journal Science in 1992 that showed mortality of Mediterranean fruit flies (medflies) slows at older ages. This is an image by photographer Jack Kelly Clark, formerly of the UC Integrated Pest Management Program.

California Honey Festival: Show Me the Honey!

Extension apiculturist Elina Niño examines a frame in the apiary of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Show me the honey! You'll see scores of honey varietals at the third annual California Honey Festival on Saturday, May 4. And you can sample the honey, ask questions, and purchase it--the soul of a field of flowers. The free event, sponsored by...

Extension apiculturist Elina Niño examines a frame in the apiary of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Extension apiculturist Elina Niño examines a frame in the apiary of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Extension apiculturist Elina Niño examines a frame in the apiary of the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A frame of honey from the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A frame of honey from the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A frame of honey from the Harry H. Laidlaw Jr. Honey Bee Research Facility. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Bernardo Niño, staff research associate III in the Elina Niño lab and educational supervisor with the California Master Beekeeper Program, will open hives, inside a screened tent, at the California Honey Festival. Festival-goers will see the queen bee, workers and drones. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Beekeeper Bernardo Niño, staff research associate III in the Elina Niño lab and educational supervisor with the California Master Beekeeper Program, will open hives, inside a screened tent, at the California Honey Festival. Festival-goers will see the queen bee, workers and drones. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Beekeeper Bernardo Niño, staff research associate III in the Elina Niño lab and educational supervisor with the California Master Beekeeper Program, will open hives, inside a screened tent, at the California Honey Festival. Festival-goers will see the queen bee, workers and drones. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, will
Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, will "talk bees" at the California Honey Festival. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Wendy Mather, program manager of the California Master Beekeeper Program, will "talk bees" at the California Honey Festival. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Why You Should Celebrate World Robber Fly Day

A robber fly, Ommatius amula, with prey. Today (April 30) is World Robber Day. (Drawing by Charlotte Herbert Alberts.)

Quick, do you know what today is? It's World Robber Fly Day! Question is, how are you celebrating it? April 30 is both a momentous and delightful occasion for Charlotte Herbert Alberts, who studies robber flies. A fourth-year doctoral candidate in...

A robber fly, Ommatius amula, with prey. Today (April 30) is World Robber Day. (Drawing by Charlotte Herbert Alberts.)
A robber fly, Ommatius amula, with prey. Today (April 30) is World Robber Day. (Drawing by Charlotte Herbert Alberts.)

A robber fly, Ommatius amula, with prey. Today (April 30) is World Robber Day. (Drawing by Charlotte Herbert Alberts.)

UC Davis doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts in her habitat.
UC Davis doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts in her habitat.

UC Davis doctoral candidate Charlotte Herbert Alberts in her habitat.

It's all about robber flies in the habitat of Charlotte Herbert Alberts.
It's all about robber flies in the habitat of Charlotte Herbert Alberts.

It's all about robber flies in the habitat of Charlotte Herbert Alberts.

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