Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: bird dropping

It's a Bird! It's a Plane! No, It's...

The iconic anise swallowtail caterpillar is a pale green with black bands containing orange spots. This is probably the fifth instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's a bird! It's a plane! Is it Superman? No, it's a bird dropping. If you're growing sweet fennel (anise), you may have noticed what appear to be two species of swallowtail butterflies populating your plant. You'll see larvae (caterpillars) that...

The iconic anise swallowtail caterpillar is a pale green with black bands containing orange spots. This is probably the fifth instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The iconic anise swallowtail caterpillar is a pale green with black bands containing orange spots. This is probably the fifth instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The iconic anise swallowtail caterpillar is a pale green with black bands containing orange spots. This is probably the fifth instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of an anise swallowtail caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dorsal view of an anise swallowtail caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of an anise swallowtail caterpillar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This younger larva of the anise swallowtail resembles a bird dropping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This younger larva of the anise swallowtail resembles a bird dropping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This younger larva of the anise swallowtail resembles a bird dropping. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This anise swallowtail caterpillar is shedding its skin or molting, leaving its “bird dropping” skin behind.  This is probably the third instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This anise swallowtail caterpillar is shedding its skin or molting, leaving its “bird dropping” skin behind. This is probably the third instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This anise swallowtail caterpillar is shedding its skin or molting, leaving its “bird dropping” skin behind. This is probably the third instar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult anise swallowtail nectaring on Verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An adult anise swallowtail nectaring on Verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An adult anise swallowtail nectaring on Verbena. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2018 at 3:27 PM
 
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