Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: damselflies

Blue as Blue Can Be

A male tule bluet on a fading Mexican sunflower blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

They look like shiny blue and black needles. Make that "flying" shiny blue and black needles. We spotted this damselfly foraging on a Mexican sunflower (Tithonia) this week  in our family bee garden. The blue was breathtaking. Can anything be so...

A male tule bluet on a fading Mexican sunflower blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A male tule bluet on a fading Mexican sunflower blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A male tule bluet on a fading Mexican sunflower blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, August 13, 2015 at 5:57 PM

Mighty Mites!

Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)

If you've ever been "up close and personal" to a damselfly, you might have seen the water mites. Naturalist Greg Karofelas of Davis, an associate of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, has not only seen them, he has photographed them. See his truly...

Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)
Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)

Water mites on a damselfly. (Photo by Greg Kareofelas, taken with a Canon Elph)

This image shows a damselfly with water mites on its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
This image shows a damselfly with water mites on its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This image shows a damselfly with water mites on its thorax. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, June 29, 2015 at 5:36 PM

Delightful Damselflies

Damselfly with water mites (see egglike mass). The insect next to it is probably  thrips, according to Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When an egret swooped down and ate all the goldfish in our fish pond--quite a smorgasbord of goldies--we left the pond bare for a couple of months. The result was a good one: more damselflies. Damselflies lay their eggs in water, whether it be a...

Damselfly with water mites (see egglike mass). The insect next to it is probably  thrips, according to Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Damselfly with water mites (see egglike mass). The insect next to it is probably thrips, according to Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Damselfly with water mites (see egglike mass). The insect next to it is probably thrips, according to Lynn Kimsey, director of the Bohart Museum of Entomology, UC Davis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Damselfly resting in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Damselfly resting in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Damselfly resting in the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A blue damsefly brightens the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A blue damsefly brightens the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A blue damsefly brightens the garden. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, August 8, 2014 at 4:11 PM
Tags: damselflies (5), mites (1), Odonata (5), thrips (5)

Like a Needle in a Haystack

Damselfly on a leaf in the late afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Finding a tan-colored damselfly in a patch of fading English lavender is like finding a needle in the proverbial haystack. They're so tiny and inconspicuous that they're easy to miss. They're about an inch long and so slender that they look like flying...

Damselfly on a leaf in the late afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Damselfly on a leaf in the late afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Damselfly on a leaf in the late afternoon. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cluster of red mites on a damselfly in the early morning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A cluster of red mites on a damselfly in the early morning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A cluster of red mites on a damselfly in the early morning. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey

Posted on Thursday, June 26, 2014 at 10:08 PM
Tags: ant (1), damselflies (5), Zygoptera (3)

Mighty Mites on a Damselfly

Damselfly, with water mites attached, lands on the leaf of a passion flower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It pays to have a pond. A pond attracts dragonflies and damselflies. Last weekend, though, we spotted a damselfly a good 65 feet away from our pond. It touched down on our passion flower vine (Passiflora). Lights, camera, action... The enlarged photo...

Damselfly, with water mites attached, lands on the leaf of a passion flower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Damselfly, with water mites attached, lands on the leaf of a passion flower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Damselfly, with water mites attached, lands on the leaf of a passion flower vine. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 9:43 PM
 
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