Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: decline

Why Wild Bees Are in Trouble

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Our nation's wild bees--which include bumble bees, squash bees and leafcutter bees--are in trouble. A newly published study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reveals just how much trouble. (See research paper) Wild bee populations...

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A squash bee, Peponapis pruinosa, pollinating a squash. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on wild blackberry blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on wild blackberry blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A yellow-faced bumble bee, Bombus vosnesenskii, foraging on wild blackberry blossom. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leafcutter bees  pollinate alfalfa, carrots, other vegetables and some fruits. This one is foraging on a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Leafcutter bees pollinate alfalfa, carrots, other vegetables and some fruits. This one is foraging on a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leafcutter bees pollinate alfalfa, carrots, other vegetables and some fruits. This one is foraging on a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This map shows the decline of wild bees in the United States. (University of Vermont)
This map shows the decline of wild bees in the United States. (University of Vermont)

This map shows the decline of wild bees in the United States. (University of Vermont)

Posted on Monday, December 21, 2015 at 4:58 PM

Monarch Population in California 'Booming'

A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you missed it, you should to listen to what longtime butterfly researcher Art Shapiro, distinguished professor of evolution and ecology at the University of California, Davis, says about California's monarch butterfly population. He's been...

A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A handful of monarch caterpillars from one narrow-leafed milkweed plant. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a monarch chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a monarch chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a monarch chrysalis. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A newly emerged male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A newly emerged male monarch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, November 6, 2015 at 5:39 PM
 
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