Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: drone

What We Need: A Better Bee

The lifespan of this mite-infested drone will be short. The brownish-orange

Varroa mites, those pesky little parasites that suck the blood out of honey bees and spread multiple viruses, are now found throughout the world, except in Australia.Scientists blame these parasites as one of the causes of colony collapse disorder (CCD),...

The lifespan of this mite-infested drone will be short. The brownish-orange
The lifespan of this mite-infested drone will be short. The brownish-orange "bumps" are varroa mites. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The lifespan of this mite-infested drone will be short. The brownish-orange "bumps" are varroa mites. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of varroa mite on drone pupa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of varroa mite on drone pupa. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, May 25, 2012 at 7:21 PM
Tags: drone (3), Susan Cobey (83), UC Davis (164), varroa mites (11)

The Drone: Target of Attacks

Drone and worker bee

Drones--remotely piloted aircraft used in reconnaissance and target attacks--are in the news, but so are the other drones--male bees.This time of year drones are as scarce as the proverbial hen's teeth. They're not needed in the hive now--just extra...

Drone and worker bee
Drone and worker bee

NEWLY EMERGED: a drone (male bee) is the foreground. In the background is a worker bee (infertile female). They're one day old in this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Big Eyes, Bulky Body
Big Eyes, Bulky Body

DRONES are easy to spot in the hive by their big eyes and bulky body. This drone is one day old. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-Up
Close-Up

CLOSE-UP of the back of a drone head. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, October 19, 2009 at 6:36 PM

Not a Pretty Sight

Varroa Mite

It's not a pretty sight--the Varroa mite attacking a honey bee. Beekeepers are accustomed to seeing the reddish-brown, eight-legged parasite (aka "blood sucker") in their hives. UC Davis bee breeder-geneticist Susan Cobey, manager of the Harry H....

Varroa Mite
Varroa Mite

THIS VARROA MITE is feeding on a drone pupa. Varroa mites reproduce in the brood cells and attack the developing bees. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Mite Free
Mite Free

UNLIKE many bees, these drones (males) are mite free. Most hives throughout the United States have Varroa mites. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, October 9, 2009 at 6:34 PM
Tags: drone (3), Susan Cobey (83), Varroa mite (13)
 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu