Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: honey bees

This Katydid Did

Honey bees circle  a fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The katydid, as green as the leaves around it, is feeding on a yellow rose. It is paying no attention to the circling honey bees. The bees want nectar, not an encounter with a critter far bigger than they are. The katydid slowly moves from one...

Honey bees circle  a fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Honey bees circle a fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Honey bees circle a fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the fork-tailed bush katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of the fork-tailed bush katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of the fork-tailed bush katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Dorsal view of the fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Dorsal view of the fork-tailed bush katydid feeding on a yellow rose. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Fork-tailed bush katydid seems to be saying
Fork-tailed bush katydid seems to be saying "This bud's for me."(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Fork-tailed bush katydid seems to be saying "This bud's for me."(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye-to-eye with a fork-tailed bush katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Eye-to-eye with a fork-tailed bush katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Eye-to-eye with a fork-tailed bush katydid.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! Check out the frass. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Oops! Check out the frass. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Oops! Check out the frass. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Meet Some Crafty Insects at Bohart Museum of Entomology

A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Talk about "crafty"--as in cunning or sneaky--insects. Ever seen a praying mantis ambushing a cabbage white butterfly? Or an assassin bug targeting a spotted cucumber beetle? Or European paper wasps attacking a Gulf Fritillary butterfly? And, how...

A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A praying mantis dining on a cabbage white butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug targeting prey: a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
An assassin bug targeting prey: a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

An assassin bug targeting prey: a spotted cucumber beetle. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps attacking a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
European paper wasps attacking a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

European paper wasps attacking a newly eclosed Gulf Fritillary butterfly. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These
These "crafty" European paper wasps are making their nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

These "crafty" European paper wasps are making their nest. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feral honey bee colony is a work of art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A feral honey bee colony is a work of art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A feral honey bee colony is a work of art. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Monday, September 17, 2018 at 4:41 PM

And the (Bee) Beat Goes On...

A honey bee flies in formation with

It was bound to happen. A "real" honey bee flying alongside "fake" bees on a bee crossing sign. We photographed this honey bee (below) at 1/1000 of second (with a Nikon D500 and a 105mm lens with  the f-stop set at 16 and ISO at 800), but honey...

A honey bee flies in formation with
A honey bee flies in formation with "fake" bees on a bee crossing sign. Bees can flap their wings around 240 times per second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee flies in formation with "fake" bees on a bee crossing sign. Bees can flap their wings around 240 times per second. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almost flyover time again. Blue spike sage (Salvia uliginosa) is in the foreground. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's almost flyover time again. Blue spike sage (Salvia uliginosa) is in the foreground. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's almost flyover time again. Blue spike sage (Salvia uliginosa) is in the foreground. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at 5:15 PM

Bee-Hold, The Eye of the Bee-Holder

Bee-hold, the eye of a bee-holder. When you have a "Bee Crossing" sign in your pollinator garden, odds are that bees will cross right in front of that sign. And it's not always a honey bee. European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) zip around...


"Bee Crossing" signs are favorites in pollinator gardens, not for the bees, but for the humans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

"Bee Crossing" signs are favorites in pollinator gardens, not for the bees, but for the humans. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sign of the times: A European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) is surrounded by honey bees on the
Sign of the times: A European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) is surrounded by honey bees on the "Bee Crossing" sign. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sign of the times: A European wool carder bees (Anthidium manicatum) is surrounded by honey bees on the "Bee Crossing" sign. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of European wool carder bee nectaring on a blue spike salvia. The eye of a honey bee adds to this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of European wool carder bee nectaring on a blue spike salvia. The eye of a honey bee adds to this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of European wool carder bee nectaring on a blue spike salvia. The eye of a honey bee adds to this photo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 7, 2018 at 5:32 PM
Focus Area Tags: Agriculture Food Yard & Garden

Shedding Light on the Native Bees

Sarah Dalrymple, then a doctoral candidate at UC Davis, coordinated the bee mural  in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

When you visit the UC Davis Department of Entomology and Nematology's bee garden--named the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven after its primary donor--be sure to check out the colorful mural on the shed. The panels feature mostly native bees. The...

Sarah Dalrymple, then a doctoral candidate at UC Davis, coordinated the bee mural  in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Sarah Dalrymple, then a doctoral candidate at UC Davis, coordinated the bee mural in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Sarah Dalrymple, then a doctoral candidate at UC Davis, coordinated the bee mural in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Here are the artists who created the mural. Instructor Sarah Dalyrumple is in the group on the right, front row left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Here are the artists who created the mural. Instructor Sarah Dalyrumple is in the group on the right, front row left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Here are the artists who created the mural. Instructor Sarah Dalyrumple is in the group on the right, front row left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Next 5 stories | Last story

 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu