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Posts Tagged: katydids

Bodil Cass and 'The Curious Case of Katydids in California Citrus'

Postdoctoral researcher Bodil Cass will speak on

What an interesting and innovative title: "The Ecoinformatics and the Curious Case of Katydids in California Citrus." That's what postdoctoral scholar Bodil Cass of the Jay Rosenheim lab, University of California, Davis, will discuss at her seminar from...

Postdoctoral researcher Bodil Cass will speak on
Postdoctoral researcher Bodil Cass will speak on "The Ecoinformatics and the Curious Case of Katydids in California Citrus" at a seminar on Oct. 25 at UC Davis. Here's a photo of the fork-tailed katydid, Scudderia furcata, that she studies. (Photo by Bodil Cass)

Postdoctoral researcher Bodil Cass will speak on "The Ecoinformatics and the Curious Case of Katydids in California Citrus" at a seminar on Oct. 25 at UC Davis. Here's a photo of the fork-tailed katydid, Scudderia furcata, that she studies. (Photo by Bodil Cass)

In this image, fork-tailed katydids are all over citrus as part of a research project by postdoctoral scholar Bodil Cass of the Jay Rosenheim, UC Davis. (Photo by Bodil Cass)
In this image, fork-tailed katydids are all over citrus as part of a research project by postdoctoral scholar Bodil Cass of the Jay Rosenheim, UC Davis. (Photo by Bodil Cass)

In this image, fork-tailed katydids are all over citrus as part of a research project by postdoctoral scholar Bodil Cass of the Jay Rosenheim, UC Davis. (Photo by Bodil Cass)

Close-up of a fork-tailed katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a fork-tailed katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a fork-tailed katydid. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at 3:22 PM

An Insect Assembled by a Committee?

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This is an insect that looks as if it were assembled by a dysfunctional committee: long angular legs,  long antennae, and beady eyes on a thin green body. All hail the katydid. It's usually camouflaged, disguised as a leaf in the...

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A katydid nymph on a rose leaf. The nymphs re wingless and have black and white banded antennae, according to UC IPM.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katydids chew leaves, flowers, fruit and plant seeds. Here's one on a cosmos. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Katydids chew leaves, flowers, fruit and plant seeds. Here's one on a cosmos. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katydids chew leaves, flowers, fruit and plant seeds. Here's one on a cosmos. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to leave. This katydid escaped from the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Time to leave. This katydid escaped from the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Time to leave. This katydid escaped from the camera. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 2, 2017 at 5:15 PM

Katydids Did It

Close-up of a katydid nymph on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katydids did it. When it comes to the best of the industrial-strength shredding machines, they're it. The nymphs have been feeding our Iceland poppies, chewing incredible holes in petal after petal, and then looking around for more. They leave behind...

Close-up of a katydid nymph on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of a katydid nymph on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of a katydid nymph on an Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A katydid nymph, its legs visible, leaving the Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A katydid nymph, its legs visible, leaving the Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A katydid nymph, its legs visible, leaving the Iceland poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A katydid nymph (top) peers over a shredded Iceland poppy at its dinner mates. A spotted cucumber beetle is at left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A katydid nymph (top) peers over a shredded Iceland poppy at its dinner mates. A spotted cucumber beetle is at left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A katydid nymph (top) peers over a shredded Iceland poppy at its dinner mates. A spotted cucumber beetle is at left. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 3, 2016 at 6:10 PM

The Sounds of Katydids

Katydid climbing a wall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ever heard the sound of katydids? The meadow katydids, the true katydids, the round-headed katydids, the bush katydids and the shiedback katydids? They're all there, in all their glory. Entomologist/educator/author/lecturer/photographer/broadcaster...

Katydid climbing a wall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Katydid climbing a wall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Katydid climbing a wall. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nymph katydid on California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Nymph katydid on California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Nymph katydid on California golden poppy. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, August 14, 2012 at 11:05 PM
Tags: Art Evans (1), katydids (4), Songs of Insects (1)
 
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