Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
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Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: lavender

The Bee and the Butterfly

A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So here's this Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in our pollinator garden. It is all alone--for a little white. Then here come honey bees seeking to forage on the lavender, too. One bee buzzes next to the butterfly's...

A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Gulf Fritillary (Agraulis vanillae) clinging to a lavender stem in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, seeking nectar from a lavender, buzzes a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae.  (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee, seeking nectar from a lavender, buzzes a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee, seeking nectar from a lavender, buzzes a Gulf Fritillary, Agraulis vanillae. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up and over and away for the honey bee. Can't you see as big a thing as me? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
It's up and over and away for the honey bee. Can't you see as big a thing as me? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

It's up and over and away for the honey bee. Can't you see as big a thing as me? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary heads for the nearby catmint patch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Gulf Fritillary heads for the nearby catmint patch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Gulf Fritillary heads for the nearby catmint patch. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 1, 2018 at 4:42 PM
Tags: Agraulis vanillae (61), Art Shapiro (186), catmint (16), Gulf Fritillary (45), honey bees (338), lavender (27), UC Davis (164)
Focus Area Tags: Environment Yard & Garden

I'm Just a Little Ol' Honey Bee Foraging on Lavender

Peek-a-bee! Hi, it's just me, a honey bee foraging on lavender in mid-December in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I'm just a little ol' honey bee foraging on lavender. I left my warm colony in Vacaville, Calif. to see if there's any nectar out there. My sisters are hungry. I'm not sure if we have enough honey to tide us over until spring. Look, here's some...

Peek-a-bee! Hi, it's just me, a honey bee foraging on lavender in mid-December in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Peek-a-bee! Hi, it's just me, a honey bee foraging on lavender in mid-December in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Peek-a-bee! Hi, it's just me, a honey bee foraging on lavender in mid-December in Vacaville, Calif. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ahh, nectar! See my tongue (proboscis)? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Ahh, nectar! See my tongue (proboscis)? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ahh, nectar! See my tongue (proboscis)? (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I think I'll crawl over to the next blossom. Nobody around to stop me! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
I think I'll crawl over to the next blossom. Nobody around to stop me! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

I think I'll crawl over to the next blossom. Nobody around to stop me! (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bye, bye! That's it for me. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Bye, bye! That's it for me. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Bye, bye! That's it for me. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, December 14, 2017 at 4:42 PM
Tags: colony (2), foraging (1), honey bee (195), lavender (27)

UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale: Think Pollinators!

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Think bees. Think butterflies. Think plants that will attract them. The UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden is hosting its first in a series of fall plant sales on Saturday, Oct. 7 at the Arboretum Teaching Nursery on Garrod Drive, UC Davis...

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A black-faced bumble bee, Bombus californicus, forages on Purple Ginny salvia (sage). Sages are popular at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sales.(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, sips nectars from a butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, sips nectars from a butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A Western tiger swallowtail, Papilio rutulus, sips nectars from a butterfly bush, Buddleia davidii. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing honey bee heads for rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This is one of the plants available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 7. The plant yields red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A pollen-packing honey bee heads for rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This is one of the plants available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 7. The plant yields red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A pollen-packing honey bee heads for rock purslane, Calandrinia grandiflora. This is one of the plants available at the UC Davis Arboretum Plant Sale on Oct. 7. The plant yields red pollen. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, October 5, 2017 at 5:00 PM

Three's a Crowd: The Saga of Two Stink Bugs and a Bee

Find the redshouldered stink bugs in the lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So, here we are, a couple of stink bugs hidden in the lavender. Unnoticed. Undetected. Undisturbed. We're loving the lavender, and we're in the process of providing the world with more stink bugs. "Okay, we know, we know. We're red-shouldered stink...

Find the redshouldered stink bugs in the lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Find the redshouldered stink bugs in the lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Find the redshouldered stink bugs in the lavender. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee seeking nectar buzzes by the stink bugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A honey bee seeking nectar buzzes by the stink bugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A honey bee seeking nectar buzzes by the stink bugs. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee ignores the stink bugs and sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
The honey bee ignores the stink bugs and sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

The honey bee ignores the stink bugs and sips nectar. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Friday, June 9, 2017 at 4:21 PM

A Face Only a Mother Could Love?

A golden dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria, perched on lavender, stares at the photographer on Mother's Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

So there we were, on Mother's Day, looking at the yet-to-bloom English lavender in our yard. And there it was, something golden staring back at us. It was showing a face that "only a mother could love"--or an entomologist or an insect...

A golden dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria, perched on lavender, stares at the photographer on Mother's Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
A golden dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria, perched on lavender, stares at the photographer on Mother's Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A golden dung fly, Scathophaga stercoraria, perched on lavender, stares at the photographer on Mother's Day. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This golden dung fly, dead, was found on lavender next to live flies. Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, looked at its swollen belly and said it died
This golden dung fly, dead, was found on lavender next to live flies. Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, looked at its swollen belly and said it died "from entomophagous fungus--perhaps the same one that 'glues' houseflies to window panes."(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

This golden dung fly, dead, was found on lavender next to live flies. Art Shapiro, UC Davis distinguished professor of evolution and ecology, looked at its swollen belly and said it died "from entomophagous fungus--perhaps the same one that 'glues' houseflies to window panes."(Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2017 at 8:08 PM

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