Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County
University of California
Cooperative Extension San Joaquin County

Posts Tagged: leafcutter bees

Photographer Allan Jones Exudes Patience, Skill and Talent

Photographer Allan Jones of Davis focuses his camera on insects in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photographer Allan Jones of Davis exudes patience, skill and talent from the moment he enters the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven, a half-acre bee friendly garden operated by the University of California, Davis, Department of Entomology and Nematology...

Photographer Allan Jones of Davis focuses his camera on insects in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Photographer Allan Jones of Davis focuses his camera on insects in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Photographer Allan Jones of Davis focuses his camera on insects in the Häagen-Dazs Honey Bee Haven. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

A female leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, carries a leaf, a Clarkia petal, back to her nest. (Copyrighted photo by Allan Jones, used with permission)
A female leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, carries a leaf, a Clarkia petal, back to her nest. (Copyrighted photo by Allan Jones, used with permission)

A female leafcutter bee, Megachile fidelis, carries a leaf, a Clarkia petal, back to her nest. (Copyrighted photo by Allan Jones, used with permission)

This
This "honey bee vs. wasp image is designed to help define and differentiate bees and wasps,” says photographer Allan Jones. (Copyrighted image by Allan Jones, used with permission.)

This "honey bee vs. wasp image is designed to help define and differentiate bees and wasps,” says photographer Allan Jones. (Copyrighted image by Allan Jones, used with permission.)

Go Native! Be a Native Bee 'Beekeeper'

Leafcutting bees heading home to their condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

If you're yearning to be a backyard beekeeper, "go native." "Go native" with native bees, that is. Many folks are building or buying bee condos to provide nesting sites for blue orchard bees (Osmia lignaria)  and leafcutting bees (Megachile...

Leafcutting bees heading home to their condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Leafcutting bees heading home to their condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leafcutting bees heading home to their condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, shows Danielle Wishon of the California Department of Food and Agriculture a bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, shows Danielle Wishon of the California Department of Food and Agriculture a bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Native pollinator specialist Robbin Thorp, emeritus professor of entomology at UC Davis, shows Danielle Wishon of the California Department of Food and Agriculture a bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue orchard bees on display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Blue orchard bees on display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Blue orchard bees on display at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of bee nesting sites shown March 2 at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of bee nesting sites shown March 2 at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of bee nesting sites shown March 2 at the Bohart Museum of Entomology. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Wednesday, March 5, 2014 at 9:24 PM

Meet the New Tenant

Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

You can't always choose your tenants. Sometimes they choose you. Take the case of our two bee condos, which are blocks of wood drilled with holes for native bee occupancy. One, with the smaller holes, is for leafcutter bees (Megachile spp.) The other,...

Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Webweaver spun a web and then crawled into the mason bee condo to occupy a hole. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of webweaving spider occupying space in the bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Close-up of webweaving spider occupying space in the bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Close-up of webweaving spider occupying space in the bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Thursday, April 11, 2013 at 9:29 PM
Tags: bee condo (4), leafcutter bees (4), mason bees (1), spider (13), webweaver (1)

Ten Tenants

Two leafcutting bees (Megachile spp.) at their bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Ten tenants.That's how many tenants are occupying our wooden bee block, aka "bee condo."It's "home, sweet home" for leafcutting bees (Megachile spp.).Daily we see these native bees tear holes in leaves (red bud, rose, catmint, gold coin, rock purslane...

Two leafcutting bees (Megachile spp.) at their bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Two leafcutting bees (Megachile spp.) at their bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Two leafcutting bees (Megachile spp.) at their bee condo. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leafcutter bee sipping nectar from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)
Leafcutter bee sipping nectar from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Leafcutter bee sipping nectar from a rock purslane. (Photo by Kathy Keatley Garvey)

Posted on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 at 8:24 PM
Tags: bee condo (4), leafcutter bees (4), Megachile (7)
 
E-mail
 
Webmaster Email: mdhachman@ucdavis.edu